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headphones: cans for nerds, stuff that matters

A place for discussion, news, reviews and DIY projects related to portable audio, headphones, headphone amplifiers and DACs.
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White Lotus

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[Service] Build Services | Soldering | Desoldering by LightningXI / LightningKeyboards

Status: this is an active thread! Build services are open.
Hey everyone, Lightning here.
I enjoy building mechanical keyboards for myself and other community members, and have a build service open to the public. I am located in New York City (US-NY) in the United States and have had extensive experience with building over many (120+) kits over the years, ranging from budget-friendly kits and gifts for friends and relatives looking to try mechanical keyboards to high-end customs sitting on enthusiasts' desks.
What I can do:
Pricing is based on an hourly rate ($18.00), plus return shipping, and costs for supplies that I may provide (such as stabilizers, lube, etc). Check the form linked below for more details. On average, customers may expect a rate between $60-95 without including return shipping costs.
What you need to do:
  1. Gather essential build parts (keyboard case, PCB, plate, screws, stabilizers, and switches).
  2. Ship your parts to me, or arrange to meet with me locally in NYC (Midtown, UWS, or above). You must cover cost of shipping both ways. No local meetups at this time due to COVID-19
  3. Keyboard is assembled/disassembled/repaired for you. Work may be done on-camera (stream), or off-camera, at our discretion.
  4. Pay for services, and finished work is shipped or delivered back to you.
Examples of my previous work for clients:
none of these are personal builds
As well as personal builds, posted on geekhack and reddit.

If interested:

Please fill out this form, comment below saying that you've filled it, and feel free to contact me.

Note: Due to COVID-19, my ISP's network speeds have suffered and streaming viability has been reduced with no assured resolution in sight. Please note that I may opt to build without streaming, but can choose to record the build process for your viewing pleasure.
Please note that I may modify or close the queue at my discretion.
There is often a lot to consider for a custom build, and it can be overwhelming. I am happy to help answer any relevant questions you may have, and share my knowledge to inform your decisions.
Thank you for your support.
Contact & Links: You can find me on (please contact me directly only via PM or Discord):
Reddit chat may be ignored
Sponsors: Dixie Mech, Mint Autumn, Novelkeys, Prime Keyboards, Project Keyboard.
Creator Affiliate of MechanicalKeyboards.com
submitted by LightningXI to mechmarket [link] [comments]

FrSky Protocols v2.x.x - Facts and discussion

I wanted to discuss and spread awareness about these protocol updates that got released by FrSky in the beginning of 2020. A critical problem was discovered. There is a lot of drama about FrSky lately - also because of misinformation - and I think for safety matters drama should be put aside. Some people - and popular influencer in this hobby as well - advise to ignore this update because they only see the downsides and FrSky's business intentions. They totally downplay the bug that these updates address and IMHO this is irresponsible.
I will split this post in two parts: Part I is from official sources. That's for most parts FrSky itself and "Engel Modellbau & Technik" - that is an official Premier Dealer[1] in Germany. This dealer and its associates did great work to initiate all of this. In contrast to FrSky they are very vocal in their forums and provide a lot of information. Because their forums is German, I translated the information that I considered relevant.
Part II contains information, that is unofficial or from 3rd parties. People are biased and have their own intentions and goals with what they say / write on the internet (including myself, although I honestly try my best to provide an objective basis for discussion). I picked it to provide information for users of FrSky systems and its clones. This also leads into the discussion in the comments. I hope we can gather information and discuss these updates, so everyone can make their own opinion with a minimum amount of rumors and misinformation.
I will edit / add information from the comments to this post when it's backed with sources. I am not affiliated with FrSky, FPV-related dealers, manufacturers or developers in any way. I am just a regular FPV hobbyist and FrSky user.

Part I - Information by official sources

Why was this update pushed?

In Mid 2019 after reports of uncontrolled servo outputs from FrSky users in Germany, Swiss and Austria the support team of Engel Modellbau & Technik (EMT) started investigating. After intensive work in the RF lab they found the issue in the FrSky system and were able to reproduce it on command.[2]

What exactly is the problem?

I provided my own examples in the second part.
Case [A]: Typically after 2-4 faulty frames, the receiver outputs wrong values for 1 or 2 channels. All outputs are affected: PWM, PPM, SBUS, Fport, ... This often goes unnoticed because the time frame is too short (4 frames: 36ms) to make servos move or to overcome inertia of the vehicle. Although it can be heard when brushless motors are affected.
Case [B]: In some rare cases of [A] the receiver process gets disrupted. This results in a lockout of all controls for (at least) 0.9 seconds with 1 or 2 channels on the wrong value. This is long enough to fully move control surfaces or accelerate propellers to maximum speed.[2]
Apparently case [B] only happens with EU-LBT. I couldn't find any reports from users that had this issue with the FCC version.

What FrSky products are affected? [2] [3] [4] [5]

ACCST D16 and ACCESS (also R9)
EU-LBT and FCC

What did FrSky do about it?

After EMT reported their investigation and the results, FrSky took over and started developing updates for most of its products. Initially FrSky wanted to develop fixes for their ACCESS system first. After pressure from EMT, FrSky prioritized updates for ACCST.[2]
On January 16, 2020 FrSky released first updates (v2.0.1?) with following changenotes:[3]
1.Fixed the channel output error (uncontrolled servo movements) under certain conditions. 2.Strengthened correction and verification capability. * Please update the firmware of all your radios, RF modules and receivers accordingly. 
on that day also R9 ACCESS got an update that seems to address the same issue:[4]
2. Optimize CRC check algorithm and improve error correction ability. 
On January 22, 2020 EMT commented on recognized problems with v2.0.1. The bugs affected binding, telemetry, configuration of S-receivers with .lua scripts and RSSI output on XM+ receivers.[6]
In March 2020 EMT announced the next version of firmwares got tested. The firmware is considered good and gets released (on github[9]) for extensive and broad testing with many users. The goal is that all bugs get discovered and something like the issues with v2.0.1 don't happen again in a firmware that is released as stable.[7] [8]
On March 24, 2020 FrSky pushed the v2.1.0 update onto their downloads page. The buggy v2.0.1 got retracted. Also older firmwares - other than the latest pre-v2.x.x - are no longer available for download for many products.[10] [11]
On April 21, 2020 FrSky released more updates for ACCESS.[5]

Part II - Additional Information (3rd party)

I think good resources for information and other discussions about v2.x.x can be found in the RCgroups thread and in the Github issues.

"This is only here to fight against clones and buyers of FrSky products have all the hassle. This bug is just a farce!"

No - mostly. The problem with v1.x.x firmware IS REAL and serious: you can lose all control of your vehicle for over a second. It is possible that motors go full throttle while they are in your hand. It would be irresponsible by FrSky to not fix this problem.
Apparently, to fix the bug, changes were made to the CRC encryption (TX module) and decryption (receiver). So for the fix BOTH radio and receiver need updates - despite of any additional encryption or protection. CRC is needed so the receiver can decide if a frame got transmitted successfully or not. But FrSky went one step further and added protection mechanisms unrelated to the bug.[12] [13]
I know of two reasons to protect RC links: official laws/regulations and protection against clones. I save my thoughts and speculations about FrSky's intentions for the comment section.

Examples of the bug

Both examples are provided by me and occured with a FrSky Q X7 (XJT_EU170317). It was very difficult to find the actual cause and I think it's nearly impossible to detect if you break something or blackbox isn't running. It can be easily misinterpreted as a desync, worn gimbal or failsafe.
Case [A]: GoPro footage (sound on!) and blackbox screenshot - 5in FPV quadcopter, R-XSR (R-XSR_FPORT_LBT180827), D16(1-8ch))
Case [B]: DVR and blackbox screenshot - 900mm INAV plane, R-XSR (RXSR-FPORT_LBT_ACCST_191128), D16(1-8ch)
Note that in both cases failsafe procedures DO NOT get triggered. Betaflight and INAV have a 2 stage failsafe procedure: In stage 1 they wait for the receiver to reestablish connection to the radio. Stage 1 is very short by default (0.4 to 0.5 sec) and tries to keep the UAV stable - so the PID loop is active and does adjustments to the servos / motors to hold attitude. Throttle is set to 0% in Betaflight. After that - if radio connection is still lost - they go into stage 2 what is usually a drop / disarm or return-to-home for GPS-assisted UAVs.

3rd party receivers/modules and v2.x.x

The D8 protocol - what many 3rd party receivers use - is not affected.[14]
pascallanger on github worked on reverse-engineering the new firmwares so the multi-protocol modules support it. He says "FrSky TX and RX clones are possible again" (for now).[13] His multi-protocol project now binds with ACCST D16 v2.1.0.[15]
Betaflight contributers are developing ACCST v2.1.0 support for integrated SPI receivers (crazybee, whoops, ...) right now.[16]

"After flashing my receivemodule to v2.x.x, can I roll back?"

Yes. I tried this myself with R-XSR's (newest bought in Dec 2019) and the iXJT module of my Q X7 (international version, manufactured before 2018) and switching between v2.1.0 and latest pre-v2.x.x firmwares works flawless - for both receivers and the iXJT. I can't see into the future and I don't know of any cases of firmware locks with FrSky in the past. I am aware there were some rumors with ACCESS when it got announced, but it didn't make it in the releases.[17] [18] [19]

What else got changed in v2.x.x-x?

  • Rx Lost Frame SBUS Indicator[20]
[1] https://www.frsky-rc.com/purchase/
[2] https://frsky-forum.de/thread/3404-historie-und-zusammenfassung-der-wichtigsten-informationen-zum-thema-pl%C3%B6tzliche/
[3] https://www.frsky-rc.com/important-firmware-update-accst-d16/
[4] https://www.frsky-rc.com/r9m-2019/
[5] https://www.frsky-rc.com/access-2-x-x-important-firmware-update/
[6] https://frsky-forum.de/thread/3603-welche-probleme-gibt-es-noch-und-wie-wird-damit-verfahren/
[7] https://frsky-forum.de/thread/3753-neues-sicherheitsupdate-im-test/
[8] https://frsky-forum.de/thread/3784-tests-vom-sicherheitsupdate-auf-breiterer-basis/
[9] https://github.com/FrSkyRC/Firmware-Test
[10] https://www.frsky-rc.com/xjt/
[11] https://www.frsky-rc.com/r-xs
[12] https://github.com/pascallangeDIY-Multiprotocol-TX-Module/issues/319#issuecomment-607802424
[13] https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showpost.php?p=43713007&postcount=495
[14] https://youtu.be/09g5MfTdiyw?t=485
[15] https://github.com/pascallangeDIY-Multiprotocol-TX-Module/releases/tag/1.3.0.87
[16] https://github.com/betaflight/betaflight/pull/9697
[17] https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showpost.php?p=42102483&postcount=770
[18] https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showpost.php?p=42104659&postcount=773
[19] https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showpost.php?p=42113973&postcount=774
[20] https://github.com/FrSkyRC/Firmware-Test/issues/2
Edit 1: Fixed broken link for sources [18] and [19]
submitted by KKommander_SchiKK to Multicopter [link] [comments]

Electroneum Wallet and General Help Information

(Thank you to u/ProGamerIII for starting this thread idea )
HOW TO GET ETN SUPPORT for ETN APP and AnyTask
https://support.electroneum.com/
This subreddit is run by me Xterest, this is NOT an official ETN Forum and is community-run. We do not provide support on this forum.

What is Electroneum Cryptocurrency?
Electroneum is mobile and user friendly cryptocurrency tailored around the unbanked and global remittance payments. ETN bridges the gap between the unbanked and the western world and gives the unbanked employment opportunities to perform tasks via the AnyTask platform. This platform allows the unbanked to perform tasks via the gig economy, enabling them to earn more money, improving their lives.
If you want to learn more, here is an article I wrote with the former ETN Director Chris Gorman OBE that explains the Electroneum Ecosystem in great detail.
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/how-close-digital-divide-people-poverty-chris-gorman-obe-duniv
And ofcourse you can always visit the official ETN website www.electroneum.com
‐-------------------------‐-----------------------
Hi all,
Due to the new influx of people, there are many questions about the wallets. In this post, I will quickly summarize what options there are. Note that ETN is not an ERC20 Token and does not run on Ethereum.
Wallet 1: Official app/web wallet. (KYC Required)
DIFFICULTY LEVEL : VERY EASY
Who owns private keys? : Electroneum (custodial wallet like an exchange)
This is the official custodial wallet provided by Electroneum. This wallet is linked to an account that you can create on the Electroneum website. The app gives you access to the mobile TopUps and the Instant Payment System.
Where to get:
Appstore / Playstore / https://my.electroneum.com

Wallet 2: Desktop GUI Wallet (No KYC)
DIFFICULTY LEVEL : EASY - MODERATE
Who owns private keys? : You Do
This wallet is very easy to use and can be quickly set-up. It has been developed by Andre Patta (he works at Electroneum, so it’s from a reputable source). The wallet stores your private key on your computer so make sure you write the seed key on a paper.
Where to get: https://github.com/andrepatta/etn-desktop-wallet/releases/tag/v1.0-beta.0

Wallet 3: CLI Command Line Wallet (No KYC)
DIFFICULTY LEVEL : ADVANCED USER
Who owns private keys? : You Do
(Not very user friendly to the technically challenged, you are better off with GUI wallet if command line scares you and you don't want to do KYC)
https://github.com/electroneum/electroneum/releases
you can also run a node with the binaries found here.

Additional Information and tutorials in regards to Electroneum can also be found here
www.electroneum101.com
https://community.electroneum.com/c/how-to/

Ways to Earn ETN
Complete Tasks on AnyTask - (Flag Ship Product)
https://www.anytask.com
Cloud Rewards with ETN App (Play Store or Apple IOS Store) - Formally known as Cloud Miner (To be discontinued soon)
Learn Digital Skills to complete tasks on AnyTask with Task School
https://www.taskschool.com/

Places to Buy Mobile TopUps with ETN
1) Purchase Directly with the Official ETN App
2) Purchase via my 3rd Party Site AltCoin TopUp (Much Lower Prices than Official App, why pay more?)
https://www.altcointopup.com

Best Exchanges to Buy ETN that have Volume
Kucoin
Liquid
HUOBI
More exchange listing can be found the ETN App
submitted by xterest27 to Electroneum [link] [comments]

Tools & Info for Sysadmins - Mega List of Tips, Tools, Books, Blogs & More

Hi sysadmin,
It's been 6 months since we launched the full list on our website. We decided to celebrate with a mega list of the items we've featured since then, broken down by category. Enjoy!
To make sure I'm following the rules of rsysadmin, rather than link directly to our website for sign up for the weekly email I'm experimenting with reddit ads so:
You can sign up to get this in your inbox each week (with extras) by following this link.
** We're looking for tips from IT Pros, SysAdmins and MSPs in IT Pro Tuesday. This could be command line, shortcuts, process, security or whatever else makes you more effective at doing your job. Please leave a comment with your favorite tip(s), and we'll feature them over the following weeks.
Now on with the tools... As always, EveryCloud has no known affiliation with any of these unless we explicitly state otherwise.
Free Tools
Pageant is an SSH authentication agent that makes it easier to connect to Unix or Linux machines via PuTTY. Appreciated by plazman30 who says, "It took me WAY TOO LONG to discover this one. Pageant is a component of Putty. It sits in your system tray and will let you load SSH keys into it and pass them through to putty, WinSCP, and number of other apps that support it."
NCurses Disk Usage is a disk usage analyzer with an ncurses interface. It is fast, simple and easy and should run in any minimal POSIX-like environment with ncurses installed. Recommended by durgadas as "something I install on all my Linuxes... Makes finding out sizes semi-graphical, [with] super easy nav. Good for places without monitoring—lightweight and fast; works on nearly all flavors of Unix I've needed."
AutoHotkey is an open-source scripting language for Windows that helps you easily create small to complex scripts for all sorts of tasks (form fillers, auto-clicking, macros, etc.) Automate any desktop task with this small, fast tool that runs out-of-the-box. Recommended by plazman30 as a "pretty robust Windows scripting language. I use it mostly for on-the-fly pattern substitution. It's nice to be able to type 'bl1' and have it auto-replace it my bridge line phone number."
PingInfoView lets you easily ping multiple host names and IP addresses, with the results compiled in a single table. Automatically pings all hosts at the interval you specify, and displays the number of successful and failed pings, as well as average ping time. Results can be saved as a text/html/xml file or copied to the clipboard. Thanks go to sliced_BR3AD for this one.
DriveDroid simulates a USB thumbdrive or CD-drive via the mass storage capabilities in the Android/Linux kernel. Any ISO/IMG files on the phone can be exposed to a PC, as well as any other USB thumbdrive capabilities, including booting from the drive. Can be a quick and easy option for OS installations, rescues or occasions when it helps to have a portable OS handy. Suggested by codywarmbo, who likes it because of the ability to "Boot a PC using ISO files stored on your Android phone... Having a 256GB SD full of any OS you want is super handy!"
FreeIPA is an integrated identity and authentication solution for Linux/UNIX networked environments. It combines Linux (Fedora), 389 Directory Server, MIT Kerberos, NTP, DNS and Dogtag (Certificate System). Provides centralized authentication, authorization and account information by storing data about user, groups, hosts and other objects necessary to manage the security of a network. Thanks to skarsol, who recommends it as an open-source solution for cross-system, cross-platform, multi-user authentication.
PCmover Profile Migrator migrates applications, files and settings between any two user profiles on the same computer to help set up PCs with O365 Business. User profile apps, data and settings are quickly and easily transferred from the old local AD users to new Azure AD users. Can be good for migrating data from a user profile associated with a former domain to a new profile on a new domain. Suggested by a_pojke, who found it useful "to help migrate profiles to 0365/AAD; it's been a life saver with some recent onboards."
GNU Guix is a Linux package manager that is based on the Nix package manager, with Guile Scheme APIs. It is an advanced distribution of the GNU OS that specializes in providing exclusively free software. Supports transactional upgrades and roll-backs, unprivileged package management and more. When used as a standalone distribution, Guix supports declarative system configuration for transparent and reproducible operating systems. Comes with thousands of packages, which include applications, system tools, documentation, fonts and more. Recommended by necrophcodr.
Attack Surface Analyzer 2.0 is the latest version of the MS tool for taking a snapshot of your system state before and after installation of software. It displays changes to key elements of the system attack surface so you can view changes resulting from the introduction of the new code. This updated version is a rewrite of the classic 1.0 version from 2012, which covered older versions of Windows. It is available for download or as source code on Github. Credit for alerting us to this one goes to Kent Chen.
Process Hacker is an open-source process viewer that can help with debugging, malware detection, analyzing software and system monitoring. Features include: a clear overview of running processes and resource usage, detailed system information and graphs, viewing and editing services and more. Recommended by k3nnyfr, who likes it as a "ProcessExplorer alternative, good for debugging SRP and AppLocker issues."
Q-Dir (the Quad Explorer) provides quick, simple access to hard disks, network folders, USB-sticks, floppy disks and other storage devices. Includes both 32-bit and 64-bit versions, and the correct one is used automatically. This tool has found a fan in user_none, who raves, "Q-Dir is awesome! I searched high and low for a good, multi-pane Explorer replacement that didn't have a whole bunch of junk, and Q-Dir is it. Fantastic bit of software."
iftop is a command-line system monitor tool that lets you display bandwidth usage on an interface. It produces a frequently updated list of network connections, ordered according to bandwidth usage—which can help in identifying the cause of some network slowdowns. Appreciated by zorinlynx, who likes that it "[l]ets you watch a network interface and see the largest flows. Good way to find out what's using up all your bandwidth."
Delprof2 is a command-line-based application for deleting user profiles in a local or remote Windows computer according to the criteria you set. Designed to be easy to use with even very basic command-line skills. This one is thanks to Evelen1, who says, "I use this when computers have problems due to profiles taking up all the hard drive space."
MSYS2 is a Windows software distribution and building platform. This independent rewrite of MSYS, based on modern Cygwin (POSIX compatibility layer) and MinGW-w64, aims for better interoperability with native Windows software. It includes a bash shell, Autotools, revision control systems and more for building native Windows applications using MinGW-w64 toolchains. The package management system provides easy installation. Thanks for this one go to Anonymouspock, who says, "It's a mingw environment with the Arch Linux pacman package manager. I use it for ssh'ing into things, which it does very well since it has a proper VT220 compatible terminal with an excellent developer."
FastCopy is the fastest copy/backup software for Windows. Supports UNICODE and over MAX_PATH (260 characters) file pathnames. Uses multi-threads to bring out the best speed of devices and doesn't hog resources, because MFC is not used. Recommended by DoTheEvolution as the "fastest, comfiest copy I ever used. [I]t behaves just like I want, won't shit itself on trying to read damaged hdd, long paths are no problem, logs stuff, can shutdown after done, got it integrated into portable totalcommander."
Baby Web Server is an alternative for Microsoft's IIS. This simple web server offers support for ASP, with extremely simple setup. The server is multi threaded, features a real-time server log and allows you to configure a directory for webpages and default HTML page. Offers support for GET, POST and HEAD methods (form processing); sends directory listing if default HTML is not found in directory; native ASP, cookie and SSI support; and statistics on total connections, successful and failed requests and more. Limited to 5 simultaneous connections. FatherPrax tells us it's "[g]reat for when you're having to update esoteric firmware at client sites."
Bping is a Windows ping alternative that beeps whenever a reply comes in. Can allow you to keep track of your pings without having to watch the monitor. According to the recommendation from bcahill, "you can set it to beep on ping reply or on ping failure (default). I love it because if I'm wanting to monitor when a server goes up or down, I can leave it running in the background and I'll know the instant the status changes."
LDAPExplorerTool is a multi-platform graphical LDAP browser and tool for browsing, modifying and managing LDAP servers. Tested for Windows and Linux (Debian, Red Hat, Mandriva). Features SSL/TLS & full UNICODE support, the ability to create/edit/remove LDAP objects and multivalue support (including edition). Endorsed by TotallyNotIT... "Holy hell, that thing is useful."
MxToolbox is a tool that lists the MX records for a domain in priority order. Changes to MX Records show up instantly because the MX lookup is done directly against the domain's authoritative name server. Diagnostics connects to the mail server, verifies reverse DNS records, performs a simple Open Relay check and measures response time performance. Also lets you check each MX record (IP Address) against 105 blacklists. Razorray21 tells us it's an "excellent site for troubleshooting public DNS issues."
Proxmox Virtual Environment is a Debian-based Linux distribution with a modified Ubuntu LTS kernel that allows deployment and management of virtual machines and containers. Suggested by -quakeguy-, who says, "Proxmox is totally killer, particularly if you don't want to spend a ton of money and like ZFS."
Multi Commander is a multi-tabbed file manager that is an alternative to Windows Explorer. It has all the standard features of a file manager plus more-advanced features, like auto-unpacking; auto-sorting; editing the Windows Registry and accessing FTP; searching for and viewing files and pictures. Includes built-in scripting support. Reverent tells us "What I love about Multicommander is that it basically acts as a launcher for all my tools. Documents automatically open up in my preferred editor (vscode), compressed files automatically open up in 7-zip, I have a ton of custom shortcuts bound to hotkeys, and it has a bunch of built-in tools. I can even do cool things like open up consolez in the focused directory and choose to open CMD, Powershell, or Powershell 6 (portable) and whether it runs as admin or not. Oh yeah, and it's all portable. It and all the tool dependencies run off the USB."
Apache Guacamole is a remote desktop gateway that supports standard protocols like VNC, RDP and SSH. The client is an HTML5 web app that requires no plugins or client software. Once installed on a server, desktops are accessible from anywhere via web browser. Both the Guacamole server and a desktop OS can be hosted in the cloud, so desktops can be virtual. Built on its own stack of core APIs, Guacamole can be tightly integrated into other applications. "Fir3start3r likes it because it "will allow you to RDP/VNC/TELNET/SSH to any device that it can reach via a web browser....you can set up folders/subfolders for groups of devices to keep things organized - love it!!"
ShowKeyPlus is a simple Windows product key finder and validation checker for Windows 7, 8 and 10. Displays the key and its associated edition of Windows. Thanks to k3nnyfr for the recommendation.
Netdisco is a web-based network management tool that collects IP and MAC address data in a PostgreSQL database using SNMP, CLI or device APIs. It is easy to install and works on any Linux or Unix system (docker images also available). Includes a lightweight web server interface, a backend daemon to gather network data and a command-line interface for troubleshooting. Lets you turn off a switch port or change the VLAN or PoE status of a port and inventory your network by model, vendor, and software. Suggested by TheDraimen, who loves "being able to punch in a MAC and find what port it is plugged into or run an inventory on a range of IPs to find unused in static range..."
NetBox is an open-source web application that helps manage and document networks. Addresses IP address management (IPAM); organizing equipment racks by group and site; tracking types of devices and where they are installed; network, console, and power connections among devices; virtual machines and clusters; long-haul communications circuits and providers; and encrypted storage of sensitive credentials. Thanks to ollybee for the suggestion.
Elasticsearch Security. The core security features of the Elastic Stack are now available for free, including encrypting network traffic, creating and managing users, defining roles that protect index and cluster level access, and fully secure Kibana with Spaces (see the linked blog post for more info). Thanks to almathden for bringing this great news to our attention.
BornToBeRoot NETworkManager is a tool for managing and troubleshooting networks. Features include a dashboard, network interface, IP scanner, port scanner, ping, traceroute, DNS lookup, remote desktop, PowerShell (requires Windows 10), PuTTY (requires PuTTY), TigerVNC (requires TigerVNC), SNMP - Get, Walk, Set (v1, v2c, v3), wake on LAN, HTTP headers, whois, subnet calculator, OUI/port lookup, connections, listeners and ARP table. Suggested by TheZNerd, who finds it "nice [for] when I calculate subnet up ranges for building SCCM implementations for my clients."
Awesome Selfhosted is a list of free software network services and web applications that can be self hosted—instead of renting from SaaS providers. Example list categories include: Analytics, Archiving and Digital Preservation, Automation, Blogging Platforms ...and that's just the tip of the iceberg!
Rclone is a command-line program for syncing files and directories to/from many platforms. Features include MD5/SHA1 hash checking for file integrity; file timestamp preservation; partial-sync support on a whole-file basis; ability to copy only new/changed files; one-way sync; check mode; network sync; backend encryption, cache and union; and optional FUSE mount. Recommended by wombat-twist because it supports "many cloud/traditional storage platforms."
Freeware Utilities for Windows can be found in this rather long list. Tools are organized by category: password recovery, network monitoring, web browser, video/audio related, internet related, desktop, Outlook/Office, programmer, disk, system and other. Appreciation to Adolfrian for the recommendation.
Checkmk is a comprehensive solution for monitoring of applications, servers, and networks that leverages more than 1700 integrated plug-ins. Features include hardware & software inventory; an event console; analysis of SysLog, SNMP traps and log files; business intelligence; and a simple, graphical visualization of time-series metrics data. Comes in both a 100% open-source edition and an Enterprise Edition with a high-performance core and additional features and support. Kindly suggested by Kryp2nitE.
restic is a backup program focused on simplicity—so it's more likely those planned backups actually happen. Easy to both configure and use, fast and verifiable. Uses cryptography to guarantee confidentiality and integrity of the data. Assumes backup data is stored in an untrusted environment, so it encrypts your data with AES-256 in counter mode and authenticates using Poly1305-AES. Additional snapshots only take the storage of the actual increment and duplicate data is de-duplicated before it is written to the storage backend to save space. Recommended by shiitakeshitblaster who says, "I'm loving it! Wonderful cli interface and easy to configure and script."
DPC Latency Checker is a Windows tool for analyzing a computer system's ability to correctly handle real-time data streams. It can help identify the cause of drop-outs—the interruptions in real-time audio and video streams. Supports Windows 7, Windows 7 x64, Windows Vista, Windows Vista x64, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 x64, Windows XP, Windows XP x64, Windows 2000. DoTheEvolution recommends it as a preferable way to check system latency, because otherwise you usually "just start to disconnect shit while checking it."
TLDR (too long; didn’t read) pages is a community-driven repository for simplifying man pages with practical examples. This growing collection includes examples for all the most-common commands in UNIX, Linux, macOS, SunOS and Windows. Our appreciation goes to thblckjkr for the suggestion.
Network Analyzer Pro helps diagnose problems in your wifi network setup or internet connection and detects issues on remote servers. Its high-performance wifi device discovery tool provides all LAN device addresses, manufacturers and names along with the BonjouDLNA services they provide. Shows neighboring wi-fi networks and signal strength, encryption and router manufacturer that can help with finding the best channel for a wireless router. Everything works with IPv4 and IPv6. Caleo recommends it because it "does everything Advanced IP scanner does and more—including detailed network information, speed testing, upnp/bonjour service scans, port scans, whois, dns record lookup, tracert, etc."
SmokePing is an open-source tool for monitoring network latency. Features best-of-breed latency visualization, an interactive graph explorer, a wide range of latency measurement plugins, a masteslave system for distributed measurement, a highly configurable alerting system and live latency charts. Kindly suggested by freealans.
Prometheus is an open source tool for event monitoring and alerting. It features a multi-dimensional data model with time series data identified by metric name and key/value pairs, a flexible query language, no reliance on distributed storage (single server nodes are autonomous), time series collection via a pull model over HTTP, pushing time series supported via an intermediary gateway, targets discovered via service discovery or static configuration, and multiple modes of graphing and dashboarding support. Recommended by therealskoopy as a "more advanced open source monitoring system" than Zabbix.
MediCat is bootable troubleshooting environment that continues where Hiren's Boot CD/DVD left off. It provides a simplified menu system full of useful PC tools that is easy to navigate. It comes in four versions:
Recommended by reloadz400, who adds that it has a "large footprint (18GB), but who doesn't have 32GB and larger USB sticks laying everywhere?"
PRTG monitors all the systems, devices, traffic and applications in your IT infrastructure—traffic, packets, applications, bandwidth, cloud services, databases, virtual environments, uptime, ports, IPs, hardware, security, web services, disk usage, physical environments and IoT devices. Supports SNMP (all versions), Flow technologies (NetFlow, jFlow, sFlow), SSH, WMI, Ping, and SQL. Powerful API (Python, EXE, DLL, PowerShell, VB, Batch Scripting, REST) to integrate everything else. While the unlimited version is free for 30 days, stillchangingtapes tells us it remains "free for up to 100 sensors."
NetworkMiner is a popular open-source network forensic analysis tool with an intuitive user interface. It can be used as a passive network sniffepacket capturing tool for detecting operating systems, sessions, hostnames, open ports and the like without putting traffic on the network. It can also parse PCAP files for off-line analysis and to regenerate/reassemble transmitted files and certificates from PCAP files. Credit for this one goes to Quazmoz.
PingCastle is a Windows tool for auditing the risk level of your AD infrastructure and identifying vulnerable practices. The free version provides the following reports: Health Check, Map, Overview and Management. Recommended by L3T, who cheerfully adds, "Be prepared for the best free tool ever."
Jenkins is an open-source automation server, with hundreds of plugins to support project building, deployment and automation. This extensible automation server can be used as a simple CI server or turned into a continuous delivery hub. Can distribute work across multiple machines, with easy setup and configuration via web interface. Integrates with virtually any tool in the continuous integration/delivery toolchain. It is self-contained, Java-based and ready to run out-of-the-box. Includes packages for Windows, Mac OS X and other Unix-like operating systems. A shout out to wtfpwndd for the recommendation.
iPerf3 provides active measurements of the maximum achievable bandwidth on IP networks. Reports the bandwidth, loss and other parameters. Lets you tune various parameters related to timing, buffers and protocols (TCP, UDP, SCTP with IPv4 and IPv6). Be aware this newer implementation shares no code with the original iPerf and is not backwards compatible. Credit for this one goes to Moubai.
LatencyMon analyzes the possible causes of buffer underruns by measuring kernel timer latencies and reporting DPC/ISR excecution times and hard pagefaults. It provides a comprehensible report and identifies the kernel modules and processes behind audio latencies that result in drop outs. It also provides the functionality of an ISR monitor, DPC monitor and a hard pagefault monitor. Requires Windows Vista or later. Appreciation to aberugg who tells us, "LatencyMon will check all sorts of info down to what driveprocess might be the culprit. It will help you narrow it down even more. This tool helped me realize that Windows 10's kernel is terrible in terms of device latency when compared to previous versions."
GNU parallel is a shell tool for executing jobs—like a single command or a small script that has to be run for each of the lines in the input—in parallel on one or more computers. Typical input is a list of files, hosts, users, URLs or tables. A job can also be a command that reads from a pipe, which can then be split and piped into commands in parallel. Velenux finds it "handy to split jobs when you have many cores to use."
Kanboard is open-source project management software that features a simple, intuitive user interface, a clear overview of your tasks—with search and filtering, drag and drop, automatic actions and subtasks, attachments and comments. Thanks go to sgcdialler for this one!
Monosnap is a cross-platform screenshot utility with some nice features. Suggested by durgadas, who likes it because it "has a built-in editor for arrows and blurring and text and can save to custom locations—like Dropbox or multiple cloud services, including it's own service, Amazon S3, FTP, SFTP, Box, Dropbox, Google Drive, Yandex, Evernote... Video and gaming screen capture also, shrink Retina screenshot preference, etc, etc... Every feature I've ever wanted in a screenshot utility is there."
Advanced Port Scanner is a network scanner with a user-friendly interface and some nice features. Helps you quickly find open ports on network computers and retrieve versions of programs running on those ports. Recommended by DarkAlman, who sees it as the "same as [Advanced IP Scanner], but for active ports."
Spiceworks Network Monitor and Helpdesk allows you to launch a fully-loaded help desk in minutes. This all-in-one solution includes inventory, network monitor and helpdesk.
Microsoft Safety Scanner helps you find and remove malware from computers running Windows 10, Windows 10 Tech Preview, Windows 8.1, Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Server 2016, Windows Server Tech Preview, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2008 R2, or Windows Server 2008. Only scans when manually triggered, and it is recommended you download a new version prior to each scan to make sure it is updated for the latest threats.
CLCL is a free, clipboard caching utility that supports all clipboard formats. Features a customizable menu. According to JediMasterSeamus, this clipboard manager "saves so much time. And you can save templates for quick responses or frequently typed stuff."
Desktop Info displays system information on your desktop, like wallpaper, but stays in memory and updates in real time. Can be great for walk-by monitoring. Recommended by w1llynilly, who says, "It has 2 pages by default for metrics about the OS and the network/hardware. It is very lightweight and was recommended to me when I was looking for BGInfo alternatives."
True Ping is exactly the same as the standard ping program of Windows 9x, NT and 2000—except that it does a better job calculating the timing. It uses a random buffer (that changes at every ping) to improve performance. Thanks to bcahill for this one, who says, it "... can send pings very fast (hundreds per second). This is very helpful when trying to diagnose packet loss. It very quickly shows if packet loss is occurring, so I can make changes and quickly see the effect."
Parted Magic is a hard disk management solution that includes tools for disk partitioning and cloning, data rescue, disk erasing and benchmarking with Bonnie++, IOzone, Hard Info, System Stability Tester, mprime and stress. This standalone Linux operating system runs from a CD or USB drive, so nothing need be installed on the target machine. Recommended by Aggietallboy.
mbuffer is a tool for buffering data streams that offers direct support for TCP-based network targets (IPv4 and IPv6), the ability to send to multiple targets in parallel and support for multiple volumes. It features I/O rate limitation, high-/low-watermark-based restart criteria, configurable buffer size and on-the-fly MD5 hash calculation in an efficient, multi-threaded implementation. Can help extend drive motor life by avoiding buffer underruns when writing to fast tape drives or libraries (those drives tend to stop and rewind in such cases). Thanks to zorinlynx, who adds, "If you move large streams from place to place, for example with "tar" or "zfs send" or use tape, mbuffer is awesome. You can send a stream over the network with a large memory buffer at each end so that momentary stalls on either end of the transfer don't reduce performance. This especially helps out when writing to tapes, as the tape drive can change directions without stopping the flow of data."
TeraCopy is a tool for copying files faster and more securely while preserving data integrity. Gives you the ability to pause/resume file transfers, verify files after copy, preserve date timestamps, copy locked files, run a shell script on completion, generate and verify checksum files and delete files securely. Integrates with Windows Explorer. Suggested by DarkAlman to "replace the integrated Windows file copy utility. Much more stable, quicker transfers, crash tolerant and adds features like 'No-to-all' and 'yes-to-all' for comparing folders."
MultiDesk & MultiDeskEnforcer are a combination of a tabbed remote desktop client (terminal services client) and a service that limits connections to only those that provide the correct shared secret (keeps hackers from accessing your server via RDP even if they have the correct password). Suggested by plazman30 as being "[s]imilar to Microsoft's RDP Manager, [b]ut doesn't need to be installed and has tabs across the top, instead of the side."
The PsTools suite includes command-line utilities for listing the processes running on local or remote computers, running processes remotely, rebooting computers, dumping event logs, and more. FYI: Some anti-virus scanners report that one or more of the tools are infected with a "remote admin" virus. None of the PsTools contain viruses, but they have been used by viruses, which is why they trigger virus notifications.
Mosh is a remote terminal application that allows roaming, supports intermittent connectivity, and provides intelligent local echo and line editing of user keystrokes. It can be a more robust and responsive replacement for interactive SSH terminals. Available for GNU/Linux, BSD, macOS, Solaris, Android, Chrome and iOS. Suggested by kshade_hyaena, who likes it "for sshing while your connection is awful."
HTTPie is a command-line HTTP client designed for easy debugging and interaction with HTTP servers, RESTful APIs and web services. Offers an intuitive interface, JSON support, syntax highlighting, wget-like downloads, plugins, and more—Linux, macOS, and Windows support. Suggested by phils_lab as "like curl, but for humans."
LibreNMS is a full-featured network monitoring system. Supports a range of operating systems including Linux, FreeBSD, as well as network devices including Cisco, Juniper, Brocade, Foundry, HP and others. Provides automatic discovery of your entire network using CDP, FDP, LLDP, OSPF, BGP, SNMP and ARP; a flexible alerting system; a full API to manage, graph and retrieve data from your install and more. TheDraimen recommends it "if you cant afford a monitoring suite."
Tftpd64 is an open-source, IPv6-ready application that includes DHCP, TFTP, DNS, SNTP and Syslog servers and a TFTP client. Both client and server are fully compatible with TFTP option support (tsize, blocksize, timeout) to allow maximum performance when transferring data. Features include directory facility, security tuning and interface filtering. The included DHCP server offers unlimited IP address assignment. Suggested by Arkiteck: "Instead of Solarwinds TFTP Server, give Tftpd64 a try (it's FOSS)."
Tree Style Tab is a Firefox add-on that allows you to open tabs in a tree-style hierarchy. New tabs open automatically as "children" of the tab from which they originated. Child branches can be collapsed to reduce the number of visible tabs. Recommended by Erasus, who says, "being a tab hoarder, having tabs on the left side of my screen is amazing + can group tabs."
AutoIt v3 is a BASIC-like scripting language for automating the Windows GUI and general scripting. It automates tasks through a combination of simulated keystrokes, mouse movement and window/control manipulation. Appreciated by gj80, who says, "I've built up 4700 lines of code with various functions revolving around global hotkeys to automate countless things for me, including a lot of custom GUI stuff. It dramatically improves my quality of life in IT."
MTPuTTY (Multi-Tabbed PuTTY) is a small utility that lets you wrap an unlimited number of PuTTY applications in a single, tabbed interface. Lets you continue using your favorite SSH client—but without the trouble of having separate windows open for each instance. XeroPoints recommends it "if you have a lot of ssh sessions."
ElastiFlow is a network flow data collection and visualization tool that uses the Elastic Stack (Elasticsearch, Logstash and Kibana). Offers support for Netflow v5/v9, sFlow and IPFIX flow types (1.x versions support only Netflow v5/v9). Kindly recommended by slacker87.
SpaceSniffer is a portable tool for understanding how folders and files are structured on your disks. It uses a Treemap visualization layout to show where large folders and files are stored. It doesn't display everything at once, so data can be easier to interpret, and you can drill down and perform folder actions. Reveals things normally hidden by the OS and won't lock up when scanning a network share.
Graylog provides an open-source Linux tool for log management. Seamlessly collects, enhances, stores, and analyzes log data in a central dashboard. Features multi-threaded search and built-in fault tolerance that ensures distributed, load-balanced operation. Enterprise version is free for under 5GB per day.
Ultimate Boot CD boots from any Intel-compatible machine, regardless of whether any OS is installed on the machine. Allows you to run floppy-based diagnostic tools on machines without floppy drives by using a CDROM or USB memory stick. Saves time and enables you to consolidate many tools in one location. Thanks to stick-down for the suggestion.
MFCMAPI is designed for expert users and developers to access MAPI stores, which is helpful for investigation of Exchange and Outlook issues and providing developers with a sample for MAPI development. Appreciated by icemerc because it can "display all the folders and the subfolders that are in any message store. It can also display any address book that is loaded in a profile."
USBDeview lists all USB devices currently or previously connected to a computer. Displays details for each device—including name/description, type, serial number (for mass storage devices), date/time it was added, VendorID, ProductID, and more. Allows you to disable/enable USB devices, uninstall those that were previously used and disconnect the devices currently connected. Works on a remote computer when logged in as an admin. Thanks to DoTheEvolution for the suggestion.
WSCC - Windows System Control Center will install, update, execute and organize utilities from suites such as Microsoft Sysinternals and Nirsoft Utilities. Get all the tools you want in one convenient download!
Launchy is a cross-platform utility that indexes the programs in your start menu so you can launch documents, project files, folders and bookmarks with just a few keystrokes. Suggested by Patrick Langendoen, who tells us, "Launchy saves me clicks in the Win10 start menu. Once you get used to it, you begin wondering why this is not included by default."
Terminals is a secure, multi-tab terminal services/remote desktop client that's a complete replacement for the mstsc.exe (Terminal Services) client. Uses Terminal Services ActiveX Client (mstscax.dll). Recommended by vermyx, who likes it because "the saved connections can use saved credential profiles, so you only have to have your credentials in one place."
Captura is a flexible tool for capturing your screen, audio, cursor, mouse clicks and keystrokes. Features include mixing audio recorded from microphone and speaker output, command-line interface, and configurable hotkeys. Thanks to jantari for the recommedation.
(continued in part 2)
submitted by crispyducks to sysadmin [link] [comments]

[Slight OT] The AOWR Rolex 24 contingency megathread - Year Four!

First of all, a brief word to the community: It was cool to see some of you get a bit antsy about why a driver list for the Rolex 24 hadn't been posted yet. I promise that this will make up for the level of content we've had over the past week or so, I just didn't want to jump the gun! Besides, I made my post for last year about two weeks prior to the race so I felt like that would be a good benchmark so it wouldn't sit around and get stale. I've never been told to post on a certain day. On with our regularly scheduled content!
So it seems like everyone here already knows what time it is. It's less than a month away from the kickoff of the North American racing season, and it's time to shine up the Rolexes. We've got twenty four hours of sports car action coming up at Daytona, and as always, plenty of past and present open wheel stars are ready to take to the challenge. This is the fourth year I have compiled a list of assorted IndyCar, CART, and ChampCar drivers that will be running in the Rolex 24 at Daytona, and there are plenty of names in all four participating classes who will have a chance to score a victory and bragging rights for the open wheel fans.
To recap the open wheel names that won last year, former F1 champion and 2020 Indy 500 hopeful Fernando Alonso was among the Daytona Prototype International (DPi) winners for Wayne Taylor Racing, although it appears he will abstain from this year's running after focusing on the Dakar Rally. The Le Mans Prototype 2 (LMP2) class featured a brief CART entrant in Rodolfo Gonzalez winning with DragonSpeed, who returns at the very least with their 2019 Indy 500 Bump Day darling Ben Hanley. A GT Le Mans (GTLM) class victory for Colton Herta was the first of three combined IMSA and IndyCar wins in the young star's breakout year, and he'll be back to defend with one of Bobby Rahal's BMWs. And while GT Daytona (GTD) was the only empty-handed class last year, the class contains plenty of Rolex stalwarts with some of the fiercest top-to-bottom competition that will ensure a close fight all the way to the checkers.
As always, the maximum entry list for teams is dictated by the cars entered for the Roar Before the 24 test sessions at the beginning of the month. However, driver entries often change around in the weeks between the Roar and the race weekend itself. I will do my best to continually read up on entry changes that may necessitate this post to be edited, and to handle those edits as necessary. When all else is in doubt, consult the changelog at the bottom. If you're looking for a "final" version ready for race day, you may check out my post from 2019 here as a reference.
Let's get started with our driver list. Within any given class, cars will be ordered based on the lowest car number within each team.

DPi class:

JDC-Miller Motorsports:
5 - Sebastien Bourdais (this particular car may also be referred to as JDC-Mustang Sampling Racing)
85 - Matheus Leist / Tristan Vautier
While Sebastien Bourdais' falling out of a full-time Indy ride in 2020 is one of the biggest heartbreaks of the offseason, the multi-time Rolex class champion (winning in both prototype and GT cars, his most recent being in GTLM with Chip Ganassi in 2018) couldn't have found a better outside alternative, picking up a full time ride with some old friends on the Mustang Sampling team. The 5 car always contends at Daytona, and Bourdais will have a fire lit under his seat to ensure his migration will not be in vain. The JDC Banana Boat also picks up a second Indy name in Matheus Leist who may too be seeing the Rolex as a chance to shine when his Indy efforts cannot. This is his first big opportunity to show off in a sports car, and he's surrounded by a fine team to help him out, including Vautier contributing to a fifth place finish in last year's running.
Acura Team Penske:
6 - Juan Pablo Montoya/Simon Pagenaud
7 - Helio Castroneves/Alexander Rossi
The champs are here! Montoya and Pagenaud are fresh off of big trophies in their 2019 full-time efforts, with an IMSA DPi title for JPM and the Indy 500 for Pagenaud--and let's not forget those other four Baby Borgs amassed by the 7 team either. Both cars retain their Rolex trios from 2019, and for Montoya and company, that means three wins and seven straight podiums en route to their title. While Castroneves was part of a winless campaign, his car still picked up a quintet of podiums including bookending thirds at Daytona and Road Atlanta. Now that Penske has shown he has championship-winning material in his sports car team, this is the time to double down and prove they're in it for the long haul.
Wayne Taylor Racing:
10 - Scott Dixon/Ryan Briscoe
Uh oh. Chip Ganassi has folded his IMSA GTLM team due to Ford's withdrawal from GT factory racing. But uh oh. The best friends from down under have found a new ride together for one of the baddest prototype teams on the block. A waterlogged Rolex victory was surprisingly the only win of the season for the Taylor crew, and having picked up Briscoe as a full-time driver and Dixon as an enduro ringer, you know they're ready to make up for that. While their Ganassi GTLM car only combined for an average finish of fourth in Dixon's three 2019 starts, the last of those was a runner-up at Petit Le Mans. Briscoe himself was no slouch in the two-man races, contributing to a pair of wins at Lime Rock Park and Road America. Surely any challenger ready to take over the DPi throne at Daytona will need to contend with the 10 car along the way.
BONUS CONTENT! Might I add that not only has Dixon become a new father, but he's also going for the Daytona/Bathurst double? Usually when people talk about a 36 hour sports car sweep, it's in reference to the 24 Hours of Daytona and 12 Hours of Sebring, as the two events often go hand in hand given their temporal and physical proximity to each other. But the Liqui-Moly Bathurst 12 Hour has become of the biggest GT events of the year and given the fact it usually takes place one week after the Rolex 24, a lot of Daytona drivers have been stepping up to run at Mount Panorama, and vice versa, for a chance to win two equally demanding races in radically different environments in rapid succession.
It's understandably uncommon for drivers with prototype rides to attempt the double due to the GT-only status at Bathurst, but having Dixon's name on the Bathurst entry list opens up the potential to not just claim victory in both events, but claim overall victory in them. Tristan Vautier was the last IndyCar driver to run the double, having run both races in 2018 including second overall at Bathurst with a pro-am class victory, but Dixon is a true motorsports super-heavyweight whose ANZ affiliation is well known, and he stands an excellent chance to arrive in Australia with a win in the first leg under his belt. Dixon will be running for the Aston Martin R-Motorsport team who just also happened to finish second overall in 2019, only losing the lead in the last fifteen minutes. A great run on the mountain could influence many more prototype-oriented drivers to do the same in the future. Given that drivers are often told to beware the new father on the racetrack, these scenarios can only seem to give Dixon even more motivation behind the wheel. A lot of fans surely ought to be looking forward to the potential of an unprecedented overall sweep. END BONUS CONTENT
Whelen Engineering Racing:
31 - Mike Conway
2019 was a missed opportunity for Conway who was originally scheduled to run with the now JDC-Mustang Sampling car before passport issues prevented him from making it to Daytona, with his two eventual enduro starts resulting in a disappointing sixth and seventh. Nonetheless his relationship with Mustang's ex-team car remains strong for the new decade, having ran with them before in 2017 and 2018, and the team comes in with plenty of momentum having claimed second in the 2019 DPi standings with a big win at Petit Le Mans and the North American Endurance Cup to boot (including top twos at Daytona and Sebring). Perfect grounds for a bounceback.
Mazda Team Joest:
55 - Ryan Hunter-Reay
Daytona welcomes back RHR after having taken 2019 off from sports car competition, save for a non-enduro one-off at Mid-Ohio with Mazda. It was a solid third place effort though, and helped lead Mazda into a streak of three combined wins between their two car team. Even though Joest will be departing their partnership with the team mid-season, the results are finally there and it's time for the team to step up into being regular contenders at the endurance events after a 1-2 at Watkins Glen. Could 2020 be the year the meme team becomes the dream team?

LMP2 class: (Note - this is currently excluding James Davison who has been withdrawn from the driver lineup for the Rick Ware Racing 2 car. I will make sure to reincorporate him if he gets a new seat somewhere.)

Tower Motorsports by Starworks:
8 - Ryan Dalziel
Starworks continues to live the nomad's lifestyle in sports cars, transitioning back into a prototype role after running 2019 as a GT Daytona team. While the team abandoned a full-season campaign after five rounds last year (only scoring a best finish of sixth at Belle and failing to crack the top ten in their two NAEC starts), a resurgent LMP2 class can be the land of opportunity for anyone this season. And let's also reiterate a fact I pointed out last year that Dalziel and Starworks have won at Sebring with an LMP2 ride, so they're certainly comfortable in their new old environment.
Era Motorsports:
18 - Nicolas Minassian
With Minassian, another oddball CART/CCWS name from the 2000s shows up in the LMP2 entry list, in yet another full-time team joining the class. He comes into this season having spent 2019 mostly in an executive position for IDEC, a European Le Mans Series LMP2 team whose championship winning car included Ganassi sports car legend Memo Rojas on their roster, but he did get in a start as a substitute driver at Barcelona, helping bring the car home a respectable fifth in a deep class. As for this new team, Era's original plan was to co-op with DragonSpeed before declaring their intent to go solo. Speaking of...
DragonSpeed:
81 - Ben Hanley
DragonSpeed continues their North American ventures in 2020 with repeated efforts in the IndyCar and IMSA ranks to pad their European resume. It was yet another solid season for the team out in Europe, with Hanley chipping in to a win at the season opener at Paul Ricard while also helping the team's LMP1 efforts in WEC. In DragonSpeed's LMP2 WEC efforts (without Hanley), the team opened up 2019 with podiums at Sebring and Spa-Francorchamps before a disappointing retirement at Le Mans. The team has chosen to shelve their WEC team for the 2019-2020 season, allowing them to focus all their sports car efforts into their LMP2 machinery.
~~

GTLM class:

Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing:
25 - Colton Herta
Fear it. Run from it. In North America, the Big Boi M8 still arrives. Rahal Letterman Lanigan didn't have a flashy season in 2019, but Colton Herta still contributed to the 25 team's two lone podiums. The win at Daytona is by far the better known of the two, but there was also a third place finish at Petit Le Mans worth mentioning. Let's also not forget that the win at Daytona was influenced very much due to the heavy rains that impacted the second half of the race, and it's not unreasonable to think that rain could play a role in this year's running as well. Herta's talent was no fluke last year, and his stunning domination at Laguna Seca sealed the deal. Having retained two of his three co-drivers from last year's efforts, Herta has reason to believe he can help RLLR defend their crown.
~~

GTD class:

GRT Grasser Racing Team:
11 - Franck Perera
19 - Katherine Legge / Ana Beatriz (AKA Bia Figueiredo) (this particular car may also be referred to as GRT GEAR Racing Team)
Is it possible to be a two time defending class winner and still be looked at as a tentative favorite at best? Considering the depth of the GTD class and the fact that Grasser's winning car was a part-time entry in both of those seasons (including Perera's win in 2018), yes it can be. The 11 car, without Perera in 2019, went one and one and done, peacing out of IMSA after wins at Daytona and Sebring to put their focus back into their overseas campaigns, as they will again in 2020. A crash in the Roar Before the 24 sessions has also put a bit of a hurdle into their efforts, but they've been a pleasant surprise before and have reason to come back strong.
Meanwhile, the 19 car is one of two full-time IMSA efforts Grasser will contribute to in co-owned ventures. Legge and Beatriz had planned to team up again in an all-ladies' car after partnering in a similarly oriented ride at Daytona in 2019 for Michael Shank and company, which also included Indy veteran Simona de Silvestro. (Beatrix has since been replaced in this car.) The recent dominance of Lamborghini at both Daytona and its namesake class cannot be understated, with Grasser's aforementioned victories eventually contributing to a class manufacturer's title, and Legge will be running full-time with GTD fan favorite and former champion Christina Nielsen to boot. While the two could only muster season best finishes of fourth at Watkins Glen and sixth at Mosport and Laguna Seca, their prior successes on other teams, developing chemistry, and manufacturer change gives them plenty of opportunity to improve on their stat line for this season.
AIM Vasser Sullivan:
12 - Townsend Bell
14 - Jack Hawksworth
AVS comes into the Rolex 24 with the potential to just pop into the picture as they often do. Bell resumed a full-time GTD driving career in 2019 picking up four top fives in his first six starts (a second place at Daytona being one of three podiums) before trailing off at the end of the year, while Hawksworth got two early wins at Mid-Ohio and Belle Isle en route to sixth in the GTD standings. However, it's their co-drivers that might make the most noise in favor of their efforts at the Rolex: Bell has the assistance of Supercars star Shane van Gisbergen, who always shines in endurance events at home and abroad, and Hawksworth will get reigning NASCAR Cup Series champion Kyle Busch...who is still considering an Indy 500 ride in his future. As someone who has counted Alonso's name before for one example, let me say that Busch could be a legitimate addition to this list by the time race day comes around, if not next year's...
Heinricher Racing with Meyer Shank Racing:
57 - AJ Allmendinger
Death, taxes, and AJ Allmendinger running the Rolex 24 at Daytona with Michael Shank. After a fourth place finish at the Rolex and Shank winning the GTD drivers' championship last year, there is no surprise the streak continues into 2020. Although a win at Watkins Glen was the only podium finish in a NAEC event for the then-86 team, they struck hard in the shorter races including a set of four second place finishes (Mid-Ohio, Mosport, Lime Rock, Virginia International). Back over in the NASCAR world, Allmendinger continued to maximize his strengths, winning on the Charlotte roval in the Xfinity Series in his most recent start, a fine way to keep one's muscles flexed for this event. He also had a third place finish on the traditional Daytona oval last summer, but that car didn't pass post-race inspection; despite the disqualification Allmendinger himself made great moves all night and showed many just how strong he still is in a high throttle discipline. With Lambo pipping Acura in the manufacturers' standings, Shank's team only has more motivation to sweep the GTD championships for 2020.
~~
Suggested links for additional reading, listening, and viewing pleasure:
/USCR and /WEC
/WEC Discord
Endurance Chat - The official podcast of /WEC and company, with their fifth season about to kick off. Here's this year's Daytona episode!
Andy Blackmore's Spotter Guides - 2019 guide for reference. Always a useful tool to help check out the cars on track!
2020 guide
https://www.imsa.com/ - Official site for IMSA and all its series.
IMSA Official - The official YouTube channel for IMSA. Race footage typically contains raw video feeds combined with Radio Le Mans commentary track.
LiveScoring.us and Wytham Live Timing Aggregator - T&S alternatives to the IMSA feed. Choose LiveScoring if you like minimalism and efficiency, or Wytham if you like detail and interaction, including the ability to delay your scoring feed to sync with your viewing experience.
EDIT: 1/22/20, 12:03 AM EST - Rick Ware Racing officially scratched from entry list; James Davison will not appear in the running. Links for Endurance Chat and Blackmore spotter guide added.
EDIT: 1/23/20, 10:03 AM EST - Ana Beatriz replaced in GEAR GRT car.
submitted by Yoshiman400 to INDYCAR [link] [comments]

Tools & Info for MSPs #1 - Mega List of Tips, Tools, Books, Blogs & More

Hello msp,
This marks 6 months since we launched the full list on our website here. We decided to celebrate with a mega list of the items we've featured since then, broken down by category. I hope you enjoy it!
** We're looking to include more tips from IT Pros, SysAdmins and MSPs in IT Pro Tuesday. This could be command line, shortcuts, process, security or whatever else makes you more effective at doing your job. Please leave a comment with your favorite tip(s) and we'll be featuring them over the following weeks. **
Now on with this week's tools... As always, EveryCloud has no known affiliation with any of these unless we explicitly state otherwise.
Free Tools
Pageant is an SSH authentication agent that makes it easier to connect to Unix or Linux machines via PuTTY. Appreciated by plazman30 who says, "It took me WAY TOO LONG to discover this one. Pageant is a component of Putty. It sits in your system tray and will let you load SSH keys into it and pass them through to putty, WinSCP, and number of other apps that support it."
NCurses Disk Usage is a disk usage analyzer with an ncurses interface. It is fast, simple and easy and should run in any minimal POSIX-like environment with ncurses installed. Recommended by durgadas as "something I install on all my Linuxes... Makes finding out sizes semi-graphical, [with] super easy nav. Good for places without monitoring—lightweight and fast; works on nearly all flavors of Unix I've needed."
AutoHotkey is an open-source scripting language for Windows that helps you easily create small to complex scripts for all sorts of tasks (form fillers, auto-clicking, macros, etc.) Automate any desktop task with this small, fast tool that runs out-of-the-box. Recommended by plazman30 as a "pretty robust Windows scripting language. I use it mostly for on-the-fly pattern substitution. It's nice to be able to type 'bl1' and have it auto-replace it my bridge line phone number."
PingInfoView lets you easily ping multiple host names and IP addresses, with the results compiled in a single table. Automatically pings all hosts at the interval you specify, and displays the number of successful and failed pings, as well as average ping time. Results can be saved as a text/html/xml file or copied to the clipboard. Thanks go to sliced_BR3AD for this one.
DriveDroid simulates a USB thumbdrive or CD-drive via the mass storage capabilities in the Android/Linux kernel. Any ISO/IMG files on the phone can be exposed to a PC, as well as any other USB thumbdrive capabilities, including booting from the drive. Can be a quick and easy option for OS installations, rescues or occasions when it helps to have a portable OS handy. Suggested by codywarmbo, who likes it because of the ability to "Boot a PC using ISO files stored on your Android phone... Having a 256GB SD full of any OS you want is super handy!"
FreeIPA is an integrated identity and authentication solution for Linux/UNIX networked environments. It combines Linux (Fedora), 389 Directory Server, MIT Kerberos, NTP, DNS and Dogtag (Certificate System). Provides centralized authentication, authorization and account information by storing data about user, groups, hosts and other objects necessary to manage the security of a network. Thanks to skarsol, who recommends it as an open-source solution for cross-system, cross-platform, multi-user authentication.
PCmover Profile Migrator migrates applications, files and settings between any two user profiles on the same computer to help set up PCs with O365 Business. User profile apps, data and settings are quickly and easily transferred from the old local AD users to new Azure AD users. Can be good for migrating data from a user profile associated with a former domain to a new profile on a new domain. Suggested by a_pojke, who found it useful "to help migrate profiles to 0365/AAD; it's been a life saver with some recent onboards."
GNU Guix is a Linux package manager that is based on the Nix package manager, with Guile Scheme APIs. It is an advanced distribution of the GNU OS that specializes in providing exclusively free software. Supports transactional upgrades and roll-backs, unprivileged package management and more. When used as a standalone distribution, Guix supports declarative system configuration for transparent and reproducible operating systems. Comes with thousands of packages, which include applications, system tools, documentation, fonts and more. Recommended by necrophcodr.
Attack Surface Analyzer 2.0 is the latest version of the MS tool for taking a snapshot of your system state before and after installation of software. It displays changes to key elements of the system attack surface so you can view changes resulting from the introduction of the new code. This updated version is a rewrite of the classic 1.0 version from 2012, which covered older versions of Windows. It is available for download or as source code on Github. Credit for alerting us to this one goes to Kent Chen.
Process Hacker is an open-source process viewer that can help with debugging, malware detection, analyzing software and system monitoring. Features include: a clear overview of running processes and resource usage, detailed system information and graphs, viewing and editing services and more. Recommended by k3nnyfr, who likes it as a "ProcessExplorer alternative, good for debugging SRP and AppLocker issues."
Q-Dir (the Quad Explorer) provides quick, simple access to hard disks, network folders, USB-sticks, floppy disks and other storage devices. Includes both 32-bit and 64-bit versions, and the correct one is used automatically. This tool has found a fan in user_none, who raves, "Q-Dir is awesome! I searched high and low for a good, multi-pane Explorer replacement that didn't have a whole bunch of junk, and Q-Dir is it. Fantastic bit of software."
iftop is a command-line system monitor tool that lets you display bandwidth usage on an interface. It produces a frequently updated list of network connections, ordered according to bandwidth usage—which can help in identifying the cause of some network slowdowns. Appreciated by zorinlynx, who likes that it "[l]ets you watch a network interface and see the largest flows. Good way to find out what's using up all your bandwidth."
Delprof2 is a command-line-based application for deleting user profiles in a local or remote Windows computer according to the criteria you set. Designed to be easy to use with even very basic command-line skills. This one is thanks to Evelen1, who says, "I use this when computers have problems due to profiles taking up all the hard drive space."
MSYS2 is a Windows software distribution and building platform. This independent rewrite of MSYS, based on modern Cygwin (POSIX compatibility layer) and MinGW-w64, aims for better interoperability with native Windows software. It includes a bash shell, Autotools, revision control systems and more for building native Windows applications using MinGW-w64 toolchains. The package management system provides easy installation. Thanks for this one go to Anonymouspock, who says, "It's a mingw environment with the Arch Linux pacman package manager. I use it for ssh'ing into things, which it does very well since it has a proper VT220 compatible terminal with an excellent developer."
FastCopy is the fastest copy/backup software for Windows. Supports UNICODE and over MAX_PATH (260 characters) file pathnames. Uses multi-threads to bring out the best speed of devices and doesn't hog resources, because MFC is not used. Recommended by DoTheEvolution as the "fastest, comfiest copy I ever used. [I]t behaves just like I want, won't shit itself on trying to read damaged hdd, long paths are no problem, logs stuff, can shutdown after done, got it integrated into portable totalcommander."
Baby Web Server is an alternative for Microsoft's IIS. This simple web server offers support for ASP, with extremely simple setup. The server is multi threaded, features a real-time server log and allows you to configure a directory for webpages and default HTML page. Offers support for GET, POST and HEAD methods (form processing); sends directory listing if default HTML is not found in directory; native ASP, cookie and SSI support; and statistics on total connections, successful and failed requests and more. Limited to 5 simultaneous connections. FatherPrax tells us it's "[g]reat for when you're having to update esoteric firmware at client sites."
Bping is a Windows ping alternative that beeps whenever a reply comes in. Can allow you to keep track of your pings without having to watch the monitor. According to the recommendation from bcahill, "you can set it to beep on ping reply or on ping failure (default). I love it because if I'm wanting to monitor when a server goes up or down, I can leave it running in the background and I'll know the instant the status changes."
LDAPExplorerTool is a multi-platform graphical LDAP browser and tool for browsing, modifying and managing LDAP servers. Tested for Windows and Linux (Debian, Red Hat, Mandriva). Features SSL/TLS & full UNICODE support, the ability to create/edit/remove LDAP objects and multivalue support (including edition). Endorsed by TotallyNotIT... "Holy hell, that thing is useful."
MxToolbox is a tool that lists the MX records for a domain in priority order. Changes to MX Records show up instantly because the MX lookup is done directly against the domain's authoritative name server. Diagnostics connects to the mail server, verifies reverse DNS records, performs a simple Open Relay check and measures response time performance. Also lets you check each MX record (IP Address) against 105 blacklists. Razorray21 tells us it's an "excellent site for troubleshooting public DNS issues."
Proxmox Virtual Environment is a Debian-based Linux distribution with a modified Ubuntu LTS kernel that allows deployment and management of virtual machines and containers. Suggested by -quakeguy-, who says, "Proxmox is totally killer, particularly if you don't want to spend a ton of money and like ZFS."
Multi Commander is a multi-tabbed file manager that is an alternative to Windows Explorer. It has all the standard features of a file manager plus more-advanced features, like auto-unpacking; auto-sorting; editing the Windows Registry and accessing FTP; searching for and viewing files and pictures. Includes built-in scripting support. Reverent tells us "What I love about Multicommander is that it basically acts as a launcher for all my tools. Documents automatically open up in my preferred editor (vscode), compressed files automatically open up in 7-zip, I have a ton of custom shortcuts bound to hotkeys, and it has a bunch of built-in tools. I can even do cool things like open up consolez in the focused directory and choose to open CMD, Powershell, or Powershell 6 (portable) and whether it runs as admin or not. Oh yeah, and it's all portable. It and all the tool dependencies run off the USB."
Apache Guacamole is a remote desktop gateway that supports standard protocols like VNC, RDP and SSH. The client is an HTML5 web app that requires no plugins or client software. Once installed on a server, desktops are accessible from anywhere via web browser. Both the Guacamole server and a desktop OS can be hosted in the cloud, so desktops can be virtual. Built on its own stack of core APIs, Guacamole can be tightly integrated into other applications. "Fir3start3r likes it because it "will allow you to RDP/VNC/TELNET/SSH to any device that it can reach via a web browser....you can set up folders/subfolders for groups of devices to keep things organized - love it!!"
ShowKeyPlus is a simple Windows product key finder and validation checker for Windows 7, 8 and 10. Displays the key and its associated edition of Windows. Thanks to k3nnyfr for the recommendation.
Netdisco is a web-based network management tool that collects IP and MAC address data in a PostgreSQL database using SNMP, CLI or device APIs. It is easy to install and works on any Linux or Unix system (docker images also available). Includes a lightweight web server interface, a backend daemon to gather network data and a command-line interface for troubleshooting. Lets you turn off a switch port or change the VLAN or PoE status of a port and inventory your network by model, vendor, and software. Suggested by TheDraimen, who loves "being able to punch in a MAC and find what port it is plugged into or run an inventory on a range of IPs to find unused in static range..."
NetBox is an open-source web application that helps manage and document networks. Addresses IP address management (IPAM); organizing equipment racks by group and site; tracking types of devices and where they are installed; network, console, and power connections among devices; virtual machines and clusters; long-haul communications circuits and providers; and encrypted storage of sensitive credentials. Thanks to ollybee for the suggestion.
Elasticsearch Security. The core security features of the Elastic Stack are now available for free, including encrypting network traffic, creating and managing users, defining roles that protect index and cluster level access, and fully secure Kibana with Spaces (see the linked blog post for more info). Thanks to almathden for bringing this great news to our attention.
BornToBeRoot NETworkManager is a tool for managing and troubleshooting networks. Features include a dashboard, network interface, IP scanner, port scanner, ping, traceroute, DNS lookup, remote desktop, PowerShell (requires Windows 10), PuTTY (requires PuTTY), TigerVNC (requires TigerVNC), SNMP - Get, Walk, Set (v1, v2c, v3), wake on LAN, HTTP headers, whois, subnet calculator, OUI/port lookup, connections, listeners and ARP table. Suggested by TheZNerd, who finds it "nice [for] when I calculate subnet up ranges for building SCCM implementations for my clients."
Awesome Selfhosted is a list of free software network services and web applications that can be self hosted—instead of renting from SaaS providers. Example list categories include: Analytics, Archiving and Digital Preservation, Automation, Blogging Platforms ...and that's just the tip of the iceberg!
Rclone is a command-line program for syncing files and directories to/from many platforms. Features include MD5/SHA1 hash checking for file integrity; file timestamp preservation; partial-sync support on a whole-file basis; ability to copy only new/changed files; one-way sync; check mode; network sync; backend encryption, cache and union; and optional FUSE mount. Recommended by wombat-twist because it supports "many cloud/traditional storage platforms."
Freeware Utilities for Windows can be found in this rather long list. Tools are organized by category: password recovery, network monitoring, web browser, video/audio related, internet related, desktop, Outlook/Office, programmer, disk, system and other. Appreciation to Adolfrian for the recommendation.
Checkmk is a comprehensive solution for monitoring of applications, servers, and networks that leverages more than 1700 integrated plug-ins. Features include hardware & software inventory; an event console; analysis of SysLog, SNMP traps and log files; business intelligence; and a simple, graphical visualization of time-series metrics data. Comes in both a 100% open-source edition and an Enterprise Edition with a high-performance core and additional features and support. Kindly suggested by Kryp2nitE.
restic is a backup program focused on simplicity—so it's more likely those planned backups actually happen. Easy to both configure and use, fast and verifiable. Uses cryptography to guarantee confidentiality and integrity of the data. Assumes backup data is stored in an untrusted environment, so it encrypts your data with AES-256 in counter mode and authenticates using Poly1305-AES. Additional snapshots only take the storage of the actual increment and duplicate data is de-duplicated before it is written to the storage backend to save space. Recommended by shiitakeshitblaster who says, "I'm loving it! Wonderful cli interface and easy to configure and script."
DPC Latency Checker is a Windows tool for analyzing a computer system's ability to correctly handle real-time data streams. It can help identify the cause of drop-outs—the interruptions in real-time audio and video streams. Supports Windows 7, Windows 7 x64, Windows Vista, Windows Vista x64, Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2003 x64, Windows XP, Windows XP x64, Windows 2000. DoTheEvolution recommends it as a preferable way to check system latency, because otherwise you usually "just start to disconnect shit while checking it."
TLDR (too long; didn’t read) pages is a community-driven repository for simplifying man pages with practical examples. This growing collection includes examples for all the most-common commands in UNIX, Linux, macOS, SunOS and Windows. Our appreciation goes to thblckjkr for the suggestion.
Network Analyzer Pro helps diagnose problems in your wifi network setup or internet connection and detects issues on remote servers. Its high-performance wifi device discovery tool provides all LAN device addresses, manufacturers and names along with the BonjouDLNA services they provide. Shows neighboring wi-fi networks and signal strength, encryption and router manufacturer that can help with finding the best channel for a wireless router. Everything works with IPv4 and IPv6. Caleo recommends it because it "does everything Advanced IP scanner does and more—including detailed network information, speed testing, upnp/bonjour service scans, port scans, whois, dns record lookup, tracert, etc."
SmokePing is an open-source tool for monitoring network latency. Features best-of-breed latency visualization, an interactive graph explorer, a wide range of latency measurement plugins, a masteslave system for distributed measurement, a highly configurable alerting system and live latency charts. Kindly suggested by freealans.
Prometheus is an open source tool for event monitoring and alerting. It features a multi-dimensional data model with time series data identified by metric name and key/value pairs, a flexible query language, no reliance on distributed storage (single server nodes are autonomous), time series collection via a pull model over HTTP, pushing time series supported via an intermediary gateway, targets discovered via service discovery or static configuration, and multiple modes of graphing and dashboarding support. Recommended by therealskoopy as a "more advanced open source monitoring system" than Zabbix.
MediCat is bootable troubleshooting environment that continues where Hiren's Boot CD/DVD left off. It provides a simplified menu system full of useful PC tools that is easy to navigate. It comes in four versions:
Recommended by reloadz400, who adds that it has a "large footprint (18GB), but who doesn't have 32GB and larger USB sticks laying everywhere?"
PRTG monitors all the systems, devices, traffic and applications in your IT infrastructure—traffic, packets, applications, bandwidth, cloud services, databases, virtual environments, uptime, ports, IPs, hardware, security, web services, disk usage, physical environments and IoT devices. Supports SNMP (all versions), Flow technologies (NetFlow, jFlow, sFlow), SSH, WMI, Ping, and SQL. Powerful API (Python, EXE, DLL, PowerShell, VB, Batch Scripting, REST) to integrate everything else. While the unlimited version is free for 30 days, stillchangingtapes tells us it remains "free for up to 100 sensors."
NetworkMiner is a popular open-source network forensic analysis tool with an intuitive user interface. It can be used as a passive network sniffepacket capturing tool for detecting operating systems, sessions, hostnames, open ports and the like without putting traffic on the network. It can also parse PCAP files for off-line analysis and to regenerate/reassemble transmitted files and certificates from PCAP files. Credit for this one goes to Quazmoz.
PingCastle is a Windows tool for auditing the risk level of your AD infrastructure and identifying vulnerable practices. The free version provides the following reports: Health Check, Map, Overview and Management. Recommended by L3T, who cheerfully adds, "Be prepared for the best free tool ever."
Jenkins is an open-source automation server, with hundreds of plugins to support project building, deployment and automation. This extensible automation server can be used as a simple CI server or turned into a continuous delivery hub. Can distribute work across multiple machines, with easy setup and configuration via web interface. Integrates with virtually any tool in the continuous integration/delivery toolchain. It is self-contained, Java-based and ready to run out-of-the-box. Includes packages for Windows, Mac OS X and other Unix-like operating systems. A shout out to wtfpwndd for the recommendation.
iPerf3 provides active measurements of the maximum achievable bandwidth on IP networks. Reports the bandwidth, loss and other parameters. Lets you tune various parameters related to timing, buffers and protocols (TCP, UDP, SCTP with IPv4 and IPv6). Be aware this newer implementation shares no code with the original iPerf and is not backwards compatible. Credit for this one goes to Moubai.
LatencyMon analyzes the possible causes of buffer underruns by measuring kernel timer latencies and reporting DPC/ISR excecution times and hard pagefaults. It provides a comprehensible report and identifies the kernel modules and processes behind audio latencies that result in drop outs. It also provides the functionality of an ISR monitor, DPC monitor and a hard pagefault monitor. Requires Windows Vista or later. Appreciation to aberugg who tells us, "LatencyMon will check all sorts of info down to what driveprocess might be the culprit. It will help you narrow it down even more. This tool helped me realize that Windows 10's kernel is terrible in terms of device latency when compared to previous versions."
GNU parallel is a shell tool for executing jobs—like a single command or a small script that has to be run for each of the lines in the input—in parallel on one or more computers. Typical input is a list of files, hosts, users, URLs or tables. A job can also be a command that reads from a pipe, which can then be split and piped into commands in parallel. Velenux finds it "handy to split jobs when you have many cores to use."
Kanboard is open-source project management software that features a simple, intuitive user interface, a clear overview of your tasks—with search and filtering, drag and drop, automatic actions and subtasks, attachments and comments. Thanks go to sgcdialler for this one!
Monosnap is a cross-platform screenshot utility with some nice features. Suggested by durgadas, who likes it because it "has a built-in editor for arrows and blurring and text and can save to custom locations—like Dropbox or multiple cloud services, including it's own service, Amazon S3, FTP, SFTP, Box, Dropbox, Google Drive, Yandex, Evernote... Video and gaming screen capture also, shrink Retina screenshot preference, etc, etc... Every feature I've ever wanted in a screenshot utility is there."
Advanced Port Scanner is a network scanner with a user-friendly interface and some nice features. Helps you quickly find open ports on network computers and retrieve versions of programs running on those ports. Recommended by DarkAlman, who sees it as the "same as [Advanced IP Scanner], but for active ports."
Spiceworks Network Monitor and Helpdesk allows you to launch a fully-loaded help desk in minutes. This all-in-one solution includes inventory, network monitor and helpdesk.
Microsoft Safety Scanner helps you find and remove malware from computers running Windows 10, Windows 10 Tech Preview, Windows 8.1, Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Server 2016, Windows Server Tech Preview, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2008 R2, or Windows Server 2008. Only scans when manually triggered, and it is recommended you download a new version prior to each scan to make sure it is updated for the latest threats.
CLCL is a free, clipboard caching utility that supports all clipboard formats. Features a customizable menu. According to JediMasterSeamus, this clipboard manager "saves so much time. And you can save templates for quick responses or frequently typed stuff."
Desktop Info displays system information on your desktop, like wallpaper, but stays in memory and updates in real time. Can be great for walk-by monitoring. Recommended by w1llynilly, who says, "It has 2 pages by default for metrics about the OS and the network/hardware. It is very lightweight and was recommended to me when I was looking for BGInfo alternatives."
True Ping is exactly the same as the standard ping program of Windows 9x, NT and 2000—except that it does a better job calculating the timing. It uses a random buffer (that changes at every ping) to improve performance. Thanks to bcahill for this one, who says, it "... can send pings very fast (hundreds per second). This is very helpful when trying to diagnose packet loss. It very quickly shows if packet loss is occurring, so I can make changes and quickly see the effect."
Parted Magic is a hard disk management solution that includes tools for disk partitioning and cloning, data rescue, disk erasing and benchmarking with Bonnie++, IOzone, Hard Info, System Stability Tester, mprime and stress. This standalone Linux operating system runs from a CD or USB drive, so nothing need be installed on the target machine. Recommended by Aggietallboy.
mbuffer is a tool for buffering data streams that offers direct support for TCP-based network targets (IPv4 and IPv6), the ability to send to multiple targets in parallel and support for multiple volumes. It features I/O rate limitation, high-/low-watermark-based restart criteria, configurable buffer size and on-the-fly MD5 hash calculation in an efficient, multi-threaded implementation. Can help extend drive motor life by avoiding buffer underruns when writing to fast tape drives or libraries (those drives tend to stop and rewind in such cases). Thanks to zorinlynx, who adds, "If you move large streams from place to place, for example with "tar" or "zfs send" or use tape, mbuffer is awesome. You can send a stream over the network with a large memory buffer at each end so that momentary stalls on either end of the transfer don't reduce performance. This especially helps out when writing to tapes, as the tape drive can change directions without stopping the flow of data."
TeraCopy is a tool for copying files faster and more securely while preserving data integrity. Gives you the ability to pause/resume file transfers, verify files after copy, preserve date timestamps, copy locked files, run a shell script on completion, generate and verify checksum files and delete files securely. Integrates with Windows Explorer. Suggested by DarkAlman to "replace the integrated Windows file copy utility. Much more stable, quicker transfers, crash tolerant and adds features like 'No-to-all' and 'yes-to-all' for comparing folders."
MultiDesk & MultiDeskEnforcer are a combination of a tabbed remote desktop client (terminal services client) and a service that limits connections to only those that provide the correct shared secret (keeps hackers from accessing your server via RDP even if they have the correct password). Suggested by plazman30 as being "[s]imilar to Microsoft's RDP Manager, [b]ut doesn't need to be installed and has tabs across the top, instead of the side."
The PsTools suite includes command-line utilities for listing the processes running on local or remote computers, running processes remotely, rebooting computers, dumping event logs, and more. FYI: Some anti-virus scanners report that one or more of the tools are infected with a "remote admin" virus. None of the PsTools contain viruses, but they have been used by viruses, which is why they trigger virus notifications.
Mosh is a remote terminal application that allows roaming, supports intermittent connectivity, and provides intelligent local echo and line editing of user keystrokes. It can be a more robust and responsive replacement for interactive SSH terminals. Available for GNU/Linux, BSD, macOS, Solaris, Android, Chrome and iOS. Suggested by kshade_hyaena, who likes it "for sshing while your connection is awful."
HTTPie is a command-line HTTP client designed for easy debugging and interaction with HTTP servers, RESTful APIs and web services. Offers an intuitive interface, JSON support, syntax highlighting, wget-like downloads, plugins, and more—Linux, macOS, and Windows support. Suggested by phils_lab as "like curl, but for humans."
Prometheus is an open-source toolkit for application monitoring that's based on metrics collection for visualization and alerting. It's nice for recording any purely numeric time series and for monitoring of both machine-centric as well as highly dynamic service-oriented architectures. Offers support for multi-dimensional data collection and querying. Designed for reliability, and each Prometheus server is standalone, independent of network storage or other remote services.
LibreNMS is a full-featured network monitoring system. Supports a range of operating systems including Linux, FreeBSD, as well as network devices including Cisco, Juniper, Brocade, Foundry, HP and others. Provides automatic discovery of your entire network using CDP, FDP, LLDP, OSPF, BGP, SNMP and ARP; a flexible alerting system; a full API to manage, graph and retrieve data from your install and more. TheDraimen recommends it "if you cant afford a monitoring suite."
Tftpd64 is an open-source, IPv6-ready application that includes DHCP, TFTP, DNS, SNTP and Syslog servers and a TFTP client. Both client and server are fully compatible with TFTP option support (tsize, blocksize, timeout) to allow maximum performance when transferring data. Features include directory facility, security tuning and interface filtering. The included DHCP server offers unlimited IP address assignment. Suggested by Arkiteck: "Instead of Solarwinds TFTP Server, give Tftpd64 a try (it's FOSS)."
Tree Style Tab is a Firefox add-on that allows you to open tabs in a tree-style hierarchy. New tabs open automatically as "children" of the tab from which they originated. Child branches can be collapsed to reduce the number of visible tabs. Recommended by Erasus, who says, "being a tab hoarder, having tabs on the left side of my screen is amazing + can group tabs."
AutoIt v3 is a BASIC-like scripting language for automating the Windows GUI and general scripting. It automates tasks through a combination of simulated keystrokes, mouse movement and window/control manipulation. Appreciated by gj80, who says, "I've built up 4700 lines of code with various functions revolving around global hotkeys to automate countless things for me, including a lot of custom GUI stuff. It dramatically improves my quality of life in IT."
MTPuTTY (Multi-Tabbed PuTTY) is a small utility that lets you wrap an unlimited number of PuTTY applications in a single, tabbed interface. Lets you continue using your favorite SSH client—but without the trouble of having separate windows open for each instance. XeroPoints recommends it "if you have a lot of ssh sessions."
ElastiFlow is a network flow data collection and visualization tool that uses the Elastic Stack (Elasticsearch, Logstash and Kibana). Offers support for Netflow v5/v9, sFlow and IPFIX flow types (1.x versions support only Netflow v5/v9). Kindly recommended by slacker87.
SpaceSniffer is a portable tool for understanding how folders and files are structured on your disks. It uses a Treemap visualization layout to show where large folders and files are stored. It doesn't display everything at once, so data can be easier to interpret, and you can drill down and perform folder actions. Reveals things normally hidden by the OS and won't lock up when scanning a network share.
Graylog provides an open-source Linux tool for log management. Seamlessly collects, enhances, stores, and analyzes log data in a central dashboard. Features multi-threaded search and built-in fault tolerance that ensures distributed, load-balanced operation. Enterprise version is free for under 5GB per day.
Ultimate Boot CD boots from any Intel-compatible machine, regardless of whether any OS is installed on the machine. Allows you to run floppy-based diagnostic tools on machines without floppy drives by using a CDROM or USB memory stick. Saves time and enables you to consolidate many tools in one location. Thanks to stick-down for the suggestion.
MFCMAPI is designed for expert users and developers to access MAPI stores, which is helpful for investigation of Exchange and Outlook issues and providing developers with a sample for MAPI development. Appreciated by icemerc because it can "display all the folders and the subfolders that are in any message store. It can also display any address book that is loaded in a profile."
USBDeview lists all USB devices currently or previously connected to a computer. Displays details for each device—including name/description, type, serial number (for mass storage devices), date/time it was added, VendorID, ProductID, and more. Allows you to disable/enable USB devices, uninstall those that were previously used and disconnect the devices currently connected. Works on a remote computer when logged in as an admin. Thanks to DoTheEvolution for the suggestion.
WSCC - Windows System Control Center will install, update, execute and organize utilities from suites such as Microsoft Sysinternals and Nirsoft Utilities. Get all the tools you want in one convenient download!
Launchy is a cross-platform utility that indexes the programs in your start menu so you can launch documents, project files, folders and bookmarks with just a few keystrokes. Suggested by Patrick Langendoen, who tells us, "Launchy saves me clicks in the Win10 start menu. Once you get used to it, you begin wondering why this is not included by default."
Terminals is a secure, multi-tab terminal services/remote desktop client that's a complete replacement for the mstsc.exe (Terminal Services) client. Uses Terminal Services ActiveX Client (mstscax.dll). Recommended by vermyx, who likes it because "the saved connections can use saved credential profiles, so you only have to have your credentials in one place."
Captura is a flexible tool for capturing your screen, audio, cursor, mouse clicks and keystrokes. Features include mixing audio recorded from microphone and speaker output, command-line interface, and configurable hotkeys. Thanks to jantari for the recommedation.
(continued in part #2)
submitted by crispyducks to msp [link] [comments]

Tools & Info for Sysadmins - Windows Shortcut, Cisco Podcast, Network Tools & More

Hi sysadmin,

Each week I thought I'd post these SysAdmin tools, tips, tutorials etc.

Here are the most-interesting items that have come across our desks, laptops and phones this week. As always, EveryCloud has no known affiliation with any of these unless we explicitly state otherwise.

** We're looking to include more tips from IT Pros, SysAdmins and MSPs in IT Pro Tuesday. This could be command line, short cuts, process, security or whatever else makes you more effective at doing your job. Please leave a comment with your favorite tip(s) and we'll be featuring them over the following weeks. **

Free Tool
Elasticsearch Security. The core security features of the Elastic Stack are now available for free, including encrypting network traffic, creating and managing users, defining roles that protect index and cluster level access, and fully secure Kibana with Spaces (see the linked blog post for more info). Thanks to almathden for bringing this great news to our attention.

A Tip
Our recent tip for a shortcut to get a 4-pane explorer in Windows, triggered this suggestion from SevaraB: "You can do that for an even larger grid of Windows by right-clicking the clock in the taskbar, and clicking 'Show windows side by side' to arrange them neatly. Did this for 4 rows of 6 windows when I had to have a quick 'n' dirty "video wall" of windows monitoring servers at our branches." ZAFJB adds that it actually works when you right-click "anywhere on the taskbar, except application icons or start button."

A Podcast
The Broadcast Storm is a podcast for Cisco networking professionals. BluePieceOfPaper suggests it "for people studying for their CCNA/NP. Kevin Wallace is a CCIE Collaboration so he knows his *ishk. Good format for learning too. Most podcasts are about 8-15 mins long and its 'usually' an exam topic. It will be something like "HSPR" but instead of just explaining it super boring like Ben Stein reading a powerpoint, he usually goes into a story about how (insert time in his career) HSPR would have been super useful..."

Another Free Tool
BornToBeRoot NETworkManager is a tool for managing and troubleshooting networks. Features include a dashboard, network interface, IP scanner, port scanner, ping, traceroute, DNS lookup, remote desktop, PowerShell (requires Windows 10), PuTTY (requires PuTTY), TigerVNC (requires TigerVNC), SNMP - Get, Walk, Set (v1, v2c, v3), wake on LAN, HTTP headers, whois, subnet calculator, OUI/port lookup, connections, listeners and ARP table. Suggested by TheZNerd, who finds it "nice [for] when I calculate subnet up ranges for building SCCM implementations for my clients."

A List of Free Tools
Awesome Selfhosted is a list of free software network services and web applications that can be self hosted—instead of renting from SaaS providers. Example list categories include: Analytics, Archiving and Digital Preservation, Automation, Blogging Platforms ...and that's just the tip of the iceberg!

Have a fantastic week and as usual, let me know any comments or suggestions.
u/crispyducks

Each week we're updating the full list on our website here.
Enjoy.
submitted by crispyducks to sysadmin [link] [comments]

New Build, No Power

UPDATE 12/23: I pulled everything out of the case and rebuilt on the mobo outside of the case. I did some component isolation and went one step at a time. Mobo + CPU, mobo + CPU + RAM, mobo + CPU + RAM + GPU, and it's all working. Everything is powering on and working. I will transplant to the new case and see if I can get everything working. Sorry for the panicked post. :-D

Gah, I'm so lost/frustrated. I built a new PC and it's just. not. turning. on.
I thought it was the Corsair RM750x 750W PSU because the box arrived opened and was missing the AC power cable... so I ordered an EVGA 750 GQ. I tried this and it also did not work. I'm not even seeing the mobo light.
Separately, the case I ordered (rackmount case) by Chenbro is defective. The back wall of the case is bowed so I can't securely mount my graphics card to the case. I haven't transplanted the guts to the new case (Rosewill) but will do that once/if I can get this thing to power on.
Any ideas? I tried jumping the motherboard with a screwdriver and that did not work. The LEDs are not even showing up.
Here's my build:
Mobo GIGABYTE Z390 AORUS PRO WIFI LGA 1151 (300 Series) Intel Z390 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.1 ATX Intel Motherboard
CPU Intel Core i9-9900K Desktop Processor 8 Cores up to 5.0 GHz Turbo unlocked LGA1151 300 Series 95W
Cooler Corsair Hydro Series, H60 2018 (CW-9060036-WW), 120mm Radiator, Single 120mm PWM Fan, Liquid CPU Cooler
RAM Ballistix Sport LT 64G DDR4 (white)
Graphics Card Sapphire Radeon Nitro+ RX 590 8GB GDDR5 Dual HDMI/ DVI-D/ Dual DP OC w/ Backplate Special Edition (UEFI) PCI-E Graphic Cards 11289-01-20G
Storage Samsung 970 EVO SSD 500GB - M.2 NVMe Interface Internal Solid State Drive with V-NAND Technology (MZ-V7E500BW), Black/Red
PSU CORSAIR RMx Series RM750x 750W Power Supply
Fans Noctua Quiet Fans (120mm for the H60 + 3x 80mm)
PSU (second try) EVGA 750 GQ, 80+ GOLD 750W, Semi Modular, EVGA ECO Mode, 5 Year Warranty, Power Supply 210-GQ-0750-V1
submitted by haroldmcginty to buildapc [link] [comments]

Zealio V2 Review

DISCLAIMER FOR THE SAKE OF TRANSPARENCY
This post contains links to products on ZealPC.net, as I am a ZealPC affiliate now (I did it bois). Zeal asked me to review his switches and provide my first-hand impressions. This review was not run through Zeal beforehand and is 100% my opinion. I will receive a kickback if you click on links to the ZealPC website and make purchases. This affiliation is cookie-based so at least click on it at all c:
https://zealpc.net/Krelbit

INTRODUCTION

Hey brothers!!! I’m Krelbit.
I am a community member and vendor who specializes in modding switches and generally learning about them as a whole. That’s why I’d like to review the Zealio V2 switches today. Honestly, I had been working on this review for a while, but one night I decided to scrap that work entirely and start from scratch as I hadn’t tried the switches for a while and wanted a fresh take. I do this a lot, but I have not done it recently so I may have fallen out of the zeitgeist. Here are some other reviews that I’ve done previously:
Anyways, the goal of this review is to give a reasonable view of the Zealio R2 and tell the community if you should or should not take out that second mortgage to get a coin pouch worth of switches. To do this, I do have to disclose some certain biases:
Before that, we’ll contextualize these switches a little.
Here’s some background on the current situation in regards to tactile switches.

END INTRODUCTION

CONTEXT

Let’s start off by looking at some currently available tactile switches in the market and some quick takes on most of them.
  • MX Clear
The good ol’ boi. Always solid, in my opinion, they need at least a bit of modding all the time though.
  • Outemu Sky
I have not tried these and have no plans to due to some personal reasons.
  • Outemu Pro Purple
These are somewhere in between an MX brown and MX clear in my opinion. I don’t much like the sound but they are definitely an alternative to Zealio V1.
  • Kailh Pro Purple
These seem to be in the same camp as the Outemus and are a bit less wobbly. The bump happens at a different place on these guys though.
  • Aliaz
Who put glue inside of my Gateron Brown?
  • Hako Switches
I actually haven’t tried these so I can’t give any take on them but I just wanted to list them as part of the market because that they are.
  • Arctos
I forgot about these until I was writing the review, to be honest. Same boat as Hako switches. I’m excited to try some of these fairly soon.
We also have the big upcoming contender: The holy panda. This guy has been the talk of the town for a while and direct comparisons between the two have been happening all over the place. In this review, I will not discuss the holy panda to too much detail. This is not a holy panda review. You will see a fair amount of tidbits concerning holy pandas, however, because that’s probably a lot of the market for the Zealio V2.
In terms of switch background, I want to lastly cover the differences between Zealio V1(Zv1) and Zealio V2(Zv2). Between the Zv1 and the Zv2, There have been quite a few changes, such as:
  • Redone plastic for housing
  • Adjustment of tactile leaf to impact tactility
  • Redesign of the stem to be more tactile
  • Tolerances tightened to reduce wobble
  • Redone springs to be more snappy
I actually sent zealpc a holy panda a couple months into the development of the Zealio V2. Maybe it helped a bit, iunno. It seems he wanted to borrow some of the elements of the holy panda, yet keep it some elements (like smoothness, sound, and snappiness) very Zeal-like.

END CONTEXT

REVIEW

Now that we’ve got a bit more knowledge of the situation, we’ll look at the review.
This review is graded on six criteria. Here they are.
  • Tactility/Snappiness
How tactile the switch is. As a baseline, I will use a stock Cherry MX clear and designate that value of 5 on a scale of 1-10.
Snappiness is based on how fast the stem seems to return after being bottomed out.
  • Sound
Well, obviously, we’re looking to see how loud the switches are with sound. But we’re also looking for pitch as well. I’ve heard people say multiple things about pitches. Some prefer higher pitches and some prefer lower so I’ll just list what the pitches are rather than give them a good or bad designation.
  • Smoothness
Kind of self-explanatory. But I’ll also be trying to discuss the TYPE of smoothness as well.
  • Spring Grind/Crunch
Spring Grind or Spring Crunch is a very common occurrence inside stock switches where the switch isn’t nearly lubricated enough by the stock lubricants and ends up grinding on the bottom housing, resulting in a not so great feeling or sound. It’s happened in every stock switch I’ve tried so far to varying extents. It’s in every stock switch and is fairly unavoidable so the real question is not if it’s there or not, it’s how bad it is inside these switches. So, we’ll be examining that.
  • Wobble
Wobble is this issue where a stem does not stay completely put in the middle of the switch and instead moves around from side to side once nudged or once a keycap is mounted on top and the keycap is moved around. To me, this is a negligible non-issue and will be given much less attention than the rest of the criteria. Your experience and opinions may vary so if you have any specific questions you can ask me or comment below.
Okay! Let’s get to the actual review.
I was given two of each weight of switch, except for 65, what the heck zealpc
So, I’ve tried each switch lubed and unlubed.
First, we’ll get my quick takes off of the unlubed switches.
  • 62 gram
These are my favorite, least tactility out of the bunch but there’s already so much I can deal with it. Tactility - 8
The spring feels really snappy and it’s light enough for my bitchfingers to press repeatedly.
  • 65 gram
These feel fairly similar to the 62g, there’s really nothing special about these ones compared to the 62g except it’s slightly heavier. The tactility doesn’t really increase that much with this small of an increase in weight. Tactility - 8.1
It’s even slightly louder because of the increased weight making the upstroke louder.
  • 67 gram
These feel significantly more tactile than the 62g, weird how stuff works like that. Tactility - 9
But also, they’re significantly louder than the 62g because of their spring weight.
  • 78g
Hot damn, these things are tactile. However, I could see someone getting tired out with these quite easily. Tactility - 9.6
They’re super snappy, and as common sense would indicate they are also the loudest out of the bunch.
Next up, the lubed switches.
These switches were lubed with Krytox GPL 205 GRADE 0. Normally this lubricant does not go on tactiles but with how bumpy these things were I thought it might be a necessity, and it seems it was. I lubed the bottom housing around the spring, and along the slider rails. I lubed the stem above the sliders, on the sliders, around the back, the underside, and the legs. Yes, the legs. The tactility diminishes significantly, but these things are just so damn tactile that it doesn’t matter, and as a result, they become significantly smoother, quieter, and as a bonus, they lose their spring grind.
In order to save space in this review - (I really need to) I will just go out and say that the upstroke noise for 62, 65, and 67 after lubing is pretty much the same. I have no objective means of measuring sound consistently but I would say at least ⅓ of the upstroke gets removed after a 205g0 coat.
In order to further save space in this review, all the springs are just as snappy as they were pre-lube.
The only thing really impacted in a lot of these cases is the tactility, barring smoothness and sound.
  • 62g
Tactility - 8->7.4
  • 65g
Tactility - 8.1->7.5
  • 67g
Tactility - 9->8
  • 78g
Tactility - 9.6->8.5
The upstroke on 78g is still quite strong. I’d equate it to putting a thin layer of Krytox GPL 103 (a thin oil) on 62g Zv2’s.
Sound
The sound of a Zealio has been one of their characteristics from the very beginning. They’re quite loud, and they’re quite high pitched. This is due to using the clear plastic that makes it so smooth in the first place and I don’t see this going away and I really don’t want it to.
Smoothness
Unlubed, these switches are quite smooth. Keep in mind that Tealios are some of the smoothest stock switches on the market at the moment and these use the same housing and manufacturer. It’s challenging to compare tactiles to linears in an apples-to-apples like comparison, but in this case it’s more of a matter of K N O W L E D G E of the kind of smoothness Zealios usually have. Overall, they’re good, but the spring grind tends to detract from the experience because everything else is good.
Lube em. They’re similar to unlubed, but with the weakness of the spring grind gone and some added B U T T E R
Spring Grind
Spring grind has always been pretty bad in ZealPC’s switches in general. This is just something that happens, unfortunately. I would recommend lubing at least the springs for any ZealPC switch. It is quite detrimental to the experience and even having nice clean sounding/feeling springs, as small a change as it is, can make a pretty big difference.
Wobble
In a surprise Pepsi™ Twist, the wobble is virtually gone!
...Surprise!11!11!
This is not a twist. Wobble had been improved significantly over the course of the lifetime of Zealios, starting sometime back during R4 and finally coming to end fruition in R8 all the way to the end of the Zv1.
Overall Thoughts
If I liked tactiles, I’d like them a lot. They’re really strong and interesting tactility-wise and they’re a lot of fun to press and make the typing experience unique for sure. Once lubed the sound is much deeper and the switches feel much more pleasant to use when they’re unlubed. Overall they feel very close to a holy panda but are not quite there. There’s something inherently more “Zeal” about it to me, and that’s okay. They don’t sound that great still, but I’m a silent nut so maybe I’ll review Zilent R2 sometime. I’ll make sure to limit my word count on that one, though.

END REVIEW

COMPARISONS

I’ll take the time to compare them to other switches very briefly, now. This review is long enough and the TLDR is going to need a TLDR if I keep going like this.
  • Holy Panda
Very close in tactility but Zv2 is bigger. The holy panda seems to have a more rounded bump. Much more similar to lubed Zv2. However, holy pandas seem to have a deeper more muted sound.
  • Zanda V1 (Zv1 Stem, Panda Housing)
The Zanda V1 is smoother but does lose in the roundness and sound.
  • Zanda V2 (Zv2 Stem, Panda Housing)
What is this unholy creation
Debilitatingly Tactile
May not work
May not feel good
Other times may just feel like a holy panda
Try it at home kids
  • Cherry MX Clear
Feels closest to lubed Zv1 62g but even then is scratchier. Sounds good once spring grind is gone though. Stock Cherry springs are the worst.
  • Ergo Clear
Feels like MX brown in comparison. Rounder bump, better sound.
  • Topre
THIS IS BASED OFF OF MEMORY.
Bump is MUCH rounder than Zv2, and you get a soft bottom out and some god tier thocks so I don’t even think these are in a similar contest tbh they’re different products for different markets. Feels comfy, man.
  • Novelkeys BOX Royal Switches
They’re actually more tactile than the Zv2s, but the sound is garbage, roundness is non-existent, and they’re harsher than a breakup right before the holidays (pray4krelbit :( ).
  • Cherry MX Brown
lol

END COMPARISONS

OTHER FACTORS

Price
In the context of the overall switch market, I would say that $0.30 to $0.50 is reasonable these days to most people trying to buy tactile switches. Zv2 is $1 each out of group buy, and $0.75 each in a group buy. Factor in $15 shipping and you could be looking for $80 for just a 60% keyboard’s worth of switches.
I have sympathy for the funding of the molds and the amount of time sucked away by this project, but GOD DAMN, that’s pretty pricey. However…
In the context of the closest alternative, the holy panda is $1 per switch and a bit less if you buy in quantity, but that’s like, a really big quantity. They sit in a similar price point and a similar market, but I would get zealios personally since I know they’ll always be available, which is more than I could say for holy pandas at this point in time.
Overall, is it worth it, or not?
To me? No, fuck off, I like linears.
To you, the guy who likes tactile switches? If you’re hopping from MX brown and looking to step up, I’d honestly recommend trying different tactiles that are a bit less tactile than these ones. Step up slowly and see what you like before stepping off the deep end, you know? If you’re already off the deep end I definitely think these are worth it.
Comparison to Zv1
Zv1’s stem is going the way of the cowboy for now, and so I thought I’d take a bit of time to go over some of the alternatives in case you think you’d prefer Zealio V1 over the V2. There’s the Outemu Sky (Which I have not and will probably not try), the Cherry MX Clear and the Ergo Clear, and the new Arctos switch, which I’ll obtain to give a try sometime. I’m excited to see how they are.
Onwards to the actual comparison.
Improvements: There’s more tactility, and the stem itself is smoother. The spring is much snappier than the old one, which was already starting to get quite snappy in its own right.
Things that worsened: Overall roundedness - there’s less roundness, and the tactility is much sharper now. It still ramps up so it’s not like BOX Royal bad, but it’s much less round than before. There’s a lot of tactility. So much that it might alienate. Your mileage may vary.
Things that stayed the same: Housing sounds fairly loud and high pitched still - take that as you will, and the spring still grinds pretty hard. That’s not good.

END OTHER FACTORS

Conclusion

The Zealio V2s are really tactile. Their bump is bigger than holy pandas, and they’re quite smooth. They still have issues with spring grind and they still have a sound that can be seen as high pitched and unpleasant to some. They’re $1 each, which is pretty damn expensive, and $0.75 during a group buy. This could scare a lot of potential people off but if your brain is already damaged enough to consider buying the switches then they’d probably be a good fit for you. If you want to try getting more into tactiles, then try something a bit less tactile (and cheaper) first. Compared to some other options on the market they’re much more tactile and much more unique and fun-feeling in my opinion. The adjustments made from Zealio V1 to Zealio V2 have resulted in a tactility monster that feels good, rather than one that just feels tactile (hey BOX Royals). I would recommend giving these guys a full lube treatment, it rounds the tactility down to a more relaxed level while still being really big, yet dampens some of the sounds people don’t like and removes the spring grind that no one likes.

TLDR

  • Tactility - Good, very unique, very sharp, still round, different from all other tactiles except holy panda
  • Sound - Same as other zeal, more high-pitched, loud
  • Smoothness - Ye they good
  • Spring Grind/ Crunch - It’s there chief, lube that sucker
  • Wobble - whats that brother???!!!
  • Should you buy? - Only if you’re in the rabbit hole already. Otherwise, try something less tactile first
  • I like 62g
Until next time (Will definitely make it shorter next time this is tiring me out)
submitted by Krelbit to MechanicalKeyboards [link] [comments]

"Revolution of the Hungry"/"ثورة الجياع" News and Discussion Megathread

What's going on?
How has the government responded?
Which cities have gotten involved?
Some Notable Events:
Social Media:
UPDATES:
Here is a list of those arrested or killed between the dates of December 13th, 2018 and January 3rd, 2019, along with details as to their names, location, occupation, and political affiliation, compiled by the Independent Movement, a non-governmental organization of special consultative status in the United Nations.
Here's a website archiving footage of the government's brutality against protesters (WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT).
submitted by HatimAlTai to Sudan [link] [comments]

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