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3 Quick Tl;Dr Android Game Reviews / Recommendations (Episode 141)

Happy weekends, fellow mobile gamers! And welcome to my weekly summary of game recommendations based on the 3 most interesting games I played last week. Hope you'll enjoy :)
This week, the games include a unique RPG shooter with idle progression, an addictive new PvP bowling game with awesome graphics, and a new strategy PvP game very reminiscent of Clash Royale and MINIMax Tinyverse.
Disagree with my opinion? Let’s have a friendly discussion below.
New to these posts? Check out the first one from 141 weeks ago here.
The games are "ranked" somewhat subjectively from best to worst, so take the ranking for what it is.

Here are the games:

War Tortoise 2 [Game Size: 863 MB] (free)

Genre: Idle / RPG / Shooter - Offline Playable
Orientation: Landscape
Required Attention: Idle
tl;dr review:
War Tortoise 2 is an idle shooter with RPG-like progression. The game is fun, the concept and gameplay is very unique, and progression is decently paced.
Our objective is to protect our war tortoise as it travels around an open-world map to conquer territories. We set the target destination for our tortoise, and then buy new units and upgrade our weapons to protect ourselves against the waves of enemies standing between us and our destination.
As an idle game, our tortoise and units can shoot enemies automatically, even though manual aiming is also an option. Unlike typical idle games though, we don't get to decide when we want to reset our progress. Instead, we reset and get a huge stat boost whenever our War Tortoise dies, which makes death really meaningful in this game.
Monetization happens through occasional incentivized ads that never feel necessary to progress in the game, and iAPs that allow us to progress faster - if we want to.
Google Play: Here
YouTube First Impressions / Review: Here

Bowling Crew [Game Size: 164 MB] (free)

Genre: Sport / PvP / Action / Bowling - Requires Online Access
Orientation: Portrait
Required Attention: Full
tl;dr review:
Bowling Crew is a brand new 1v1 real-time bowling game in the vein of Golf Battle, which means we bet a certain amount of in-game gold to enter a match, with the winner taking it all.
Each match consists of just 3 rounds of turn-based bowling, where we can pick 1 of 3 bowling balls on every shot, with 6 bowling balls in our inventory in total. We get to position, aim, and define the speed of each shot, and at the of the 3 rounds, the player with the most points wins the match.
Between matches, we open lootboxes to earn more of the same bowling ball so that we can level it up to become stronger, and with a ton of different bowling balls, there are lots of different winning strategies to explore.
The gameplay is fun, the graphics are great, and despite the monetization that definitely allows us to progress faster if we buy iAPs, I haven't yet had any issues with the fairness of the matchmaking system.
Google Play: Here
YouTube First Impressions / Review: Here

World War Doh [Total Game Size: 374 MB] (free)

Genre: Strategy / PvP / Clash Royale-like - Requires Online Access
Orientation: Portrait
Required Attention: Full
tl;dr review:
World War Doh is a Clash Royale-like PvP game where we control a main hero and deploy additional units in 1v1 fights not too unlike those found in MINIMax Tinyverse.
The progression and UI is exactly like in Clash Royale, which means wait-time lootboxes that reward us with gold and unit cards. The main differentiating elements are that killing the opposing hero provides an instant win, and that chests spawn throughout each match, which allows us to recover HP or gain mana when picked up.
Monetizing through iAPs to buy more cards, the game is inevitably somewhat Pay-to-Win, and JamCity isn't exactly known for making fair monetization systems. So while the game has great humor and is fun, I'd warn against spending too much time on it. If you enjoy the gameplay, I'd instead recommend MINIMax Tinyverse.
Google Play: Here
YouTube First Impressions / Review: Here
Google Sheet of all games I've played so far (searchable and filter-able): https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1bf0OxtVxrboZqyEh01AxJYUUqHm8tEfh-Lx-SugcrzY/edit?usp=sharing
TL;DR Video Summary (with gameplay) of last week's 4 games: https://youtu.be/W5cAF8sJpGs
Episode 001 Episode 002 Episode 003 Episode 004 Episode 005 Episode 006 Episode 007 Episode 008 Episode 009 Episode 010 Episode 011 Episode 012 Episode 013 Episode 014 Episode 015 Episode 016 Episode 017 Episode 018 Episode 019 Episode 020 Episode 021 Episode 022 Episode 023 Episode 024 Episode 025 Episode 026 Episode 027 Episode 028 Episode 029 Episode 030 Episode 031 Episode 032 Episode 033 Episode 034 Episode 035 Episode 036 Episode 037 Episode 038 Episode 039 Episode 040 Episode 041 Episode 042 Episode 043 Episode 044 Episode 045 Episode 046 Episode 047 Episode 048 Episode 049 Episode 050 Episode 051 Episode 052 Episode 053 Episode 054 Episode 055 Episode 056 Episode 057 Episode 058 Episode 059 Episode 060 Episode 061 Episode 062 Episode 063 Episode 064 Episode 065 Episode 066 Episode 067 Episode 068 Episode 069 Episode 070 Episode 071 Episode 072 Episode 073 Episode 074 Episode 075 Episode 076 Episode 077 Episode 078 Episode 079 Episode 080 Episode 081 Episode 082 Episode 083 Episode 084 Episode 085 Episode 086 Episode 087 Episode 088 Episode 089 Episode 090 Episode 091 Episode 092 Episode 093 Episode 094 Episode 095 Episode 096 Episode 097 Episode 098 Episode 099 Episode 100 Episode 101 Episode 102 Episode 103 Episode 104 Episode 105 Episode 106 Episode 107 Episode 108 Episode 109 Episode 110 Episode 111 Episode 112 Episode 113 Episode 114 Episode 115 Episode 116 Episode 117 Episode 118 Episode 119 Episode 120 Episode 121 Episode 122 Episode 123 Episode 124 Episode 125 Episode 126 Episode 127 Episode 128 Episode 129 Episode 130 Episode 131 Episode 132 Episode 133 Episode 134 Episode 135 Episode 136 Episode 137 Episode 138 Episode 139 Episode 140
submitted by NimbleThor to AndroidGaming [link] [comments]

3 Quick tl;dr iOS Game Reviews / Recommendations (Episode 54)

Happy weekends, fellow mobile gamers! And welcome to my weekly summary of game recommendations based on the 3 most interesting games I played last week. Hope you'll enjoy :)
This week, the games include a unique RPG shooter with idle progression, an addictive new PvP bowling game with awesome graphics, and a new strategy PvP game very reminiscent of Clash Royale and MINIMax Tinyverse.
Disagree with my opinion? Let’s have a friendly discussion below.
New to these posts? Check out the first one from 54 weeks ago here.
The games are "ranked" somewhat subjectively from best to worst, so take the ranking for what it is.

Here are the games:

War Tortoise 2 [Game Size: 863 MB] (free)

Genre: Idle / RPG / Shooter - Offline Playable
Orientation: Landscape
Required Attention: Idle
tl;dr review:
War Tortoise 2 is an idle shooter with RPG-like progression. The game is fun, the concept and gameplay is very unique, and progression is decently paced.
Our objective is to protect our war tortoise as it travels around an open-world map to conquer territories. We set the target destination for our tortoise, and then buy new units and upgrade our weapons to protect ourselves against the waves of enemies standing between us and our destination.
As an idle game, our tortoise and units can shoot enemies automatically, even though manual aiming is also an option. Unlike typical idle games though, we don't get to decide when we want to reset our progress. Instead, we reset and get a huge stat boost whenever our War Tortoise dies, which makes death really meaningful in this game.
Monetization happens through occasional incentivized ads that never feel necessary to progress in the game, and iAPs that allow us to progress faster - if we want to.
App Store: Here
First Impressions / Review: Here

Bowling Crew [Game Size: 164 MB] (free)

Genre: Sport / PvP / Action / Bowling - Requires Online Access
Orientation: Portrait
Required Attention: Full
tl;dr review:
Bowling Crew is a brand new 1v1 real-time bowling game in the vein of Golf Battle, which means we bet a certain amount of in-game gold to enter a match, with the winner taking it all.
Each match consists of just 3 rounds of turn-based bowling, where we can pick 1 of 3 bowling balls on every shot, with 6 bowling balls in our inventory in total. We get to position, aim, and define the speed of each shot, and at the of the 3 rounds, the player with the most points wins the match.
Between matches, we open lootboxes to earn more of the same bowling ball so that we can level it up to become stronger, and with a ton of different bowling balls, there are lots of different winning strategies to explore.
The gameplay is fun, the graphics are great, and despite the monetization that definitely allows us to progress faster if we buy iAPs, I haven't yet had any issues with the fairness of the matchmaking system.
App Store: Here
First Impressions / Review: Here

World War Doh [Total Game Size: 374 MB] (free)

Genre: Strategy / PvP / Clash Royale-like - Requires Online Access
Orientation: Portrait
Required Attention: Full
tl;dr review:
World War Doh is a Clash Royale-like PvP game where we control a main hero and deploy additional units in 1v1 fights not too unlike those found in MINIMax Tinyverse.
The progression and UI is exactly like in Clash Royale, which means wait-time lootboxes that reward us with gold and unit cards. The main differentiating elements are that killing the opposing hero provides an instant win, and that chests spawn throughout each match, which allows us to recover HP or gain mana when picked up.
Monetizing through iAPs to buy more cards, the game is inevitably somewhat Pay-to-Win, and JamCity isn't exactly known for making fair monetization systems. So while the game has great humor and is fun, I'd warn against spending too much time on it. If you enjoy the gameplay, I'd instead recommend MINIMax Tinyverse.
App Store: Here
First Impressions / Review: Here
Google Sheet of all games I've played so far (searchable and filter-able): https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1bf0OxtVxrboZqyEh01AxJYUUqHm8tEfh-Lx-SugcrzY/edit?usp=sharing
TL;DR Video Summary (with gameplay) of last week's 4 games: https://youtu.be/W5cAF8sJpGs
Episode 01 Episode 02 Episode 03 Episode 04 Episode 05 Episode 06 Episode 07 Episode 08 Episode 09 Episode 10 Episode 11 Episode 12 Episode 13 Episode 14 Episode 15 Episode 16 Episode 17 Episode 18 Episode 19 Episode 20 Episode 21 Episode 22 Episode 23 Episode 24 Episode 25 Episode 26 Episode 27 Episode 28 Episode 29 Episode 30 Episode 31 Episode 32 Episode 33 Episode 34 Episode 35 Episode 36 Episode 37 Episode 38 Episode 39 Episode 40 Episode 41 Episode 42 Episode 43 Episode 44 Episode 45 Episode 46 Episode 47 Episode 48 Episode 49 Episode 50 Episode 51 Episode 52 Episode 53
submitted by NimbleThor to iosgaming [link] [comments]

4 Quick Tl;Dr Android Game Reviews / Recommendations (Episode 128)

Welcome back, fellow mobile gamers. I hope the Thanksgiving / Black Friday stress is over, and if you're looking for a new game to relax with this Sunday the 1st of December - here's a few of the best I've played last week. As always, I have covered 4 mobile games this week, and this post is my documentation of what I think about each of them.
This week's episode includes a fun monster slingshot game that feels like a mix between Airhockey and Pokemon, a team-based 8bit RPG perfect for the min-maxer in all of us, a new Tennis sports game that has been taking the mobile market with storm, and lastly, PewDiePie's newest creation; a strategy RPG called PewDiePie's Pixelings.
Disagree with my opinion? Let’s have a friendly discussion below.
New to these posts? Check out the first one from 128 weeks ago here.
The games are "ranked" somewhat subjectively from best to worst, so take the ranking for what it is.

Let's get to the games:

Capsulemon, Fight! [Game Size: 354 MB] (free)

Genre: Action / Slingshot / Airhockey-like / RPG - Offline Playable
Orientation: Portrait
Required Attention: Some
tl;dr review:
Capsulemon is a "monster slingshot" game, much like "The Muscle Hustle", which means we sling our team of creatures across the airhockey-like playing field to damage opponents and trigger combo attacks.
The gameplay is fun, combat is fast-paced and looks visually pleasing, and the monsters we select for our team all feel distinct. To my big surprise, the game even features a tiered reward system WITHOUT a battle-pass subscription for additional rewards, and lootboxes that we don't have to wait to open.
PvP is real-time, but paying users can definitely pay-to-progress-faster, so I recommend sticking to the singleplayer mode until you've unlocked enough monsters and leveled them up. I hope more singleplayer content will be added in the future to accommodate those of us who love the core gameplay but don't want to worry about the fairness of PvP.
Google Play: Here
YouTube First Impressions / Review: Here

Last Cloudia [Game Size: 980 MB] (free)

Genre: RPG / 8-bit / Team-based - Requires Online Access
Orientation: Portrait
Required Attention: Full
tl;dr review: [NOT GLOBALLY RELEASED]
Last Cloudia is a high-quality 16-bit team-based RPG with an above-average interesting combat system and a lot of depth to each character, making the game perfect for min-maxers.
During combat, we switch between our 3 characters at any time to use their different attacks, with the rest meanwhile being controlled by an AI. This system makes the game feel fast-paced and action-packed.
Each character's abilities have beautiful animations, and unlocking more heroes happens through a gacha system, which does mean that PvP will never be 100% fair. However, maxing out a character doesn't take more than 10-14 days, which is significantly less than other team-based RPGs, and so the monetization is on the lighter end of the spectrum for the genre.
If you want to learn more, the game has a decently sized sub-reddit with lots of beginner tips and strategies.
Google Play: Here
YouTube First Impressions / Review: Here

Tennis Clash [Total Game Size: 354 MB] (free)

Genre: Tennis / Sports / Action - Requires Online Access
Orientation: Portrait
Required Attention: Full
tl;dr review:
Tennis Clash is a multiplayer 1v1 sports game with simple, fast-paced gameplay, and a Golf Battle-like high-stake combat system where we bet in-game gold to enter a match, with the winner taking it all.
I enjoyed the well-executed control system, which is easy to get used to as a casual player, yet allow us enough to control to make the game feel skill-based, which means advanced players can actually become good at the game by increasing their swiping precision and predicting the opponent's next move.
Winning a match gives us a lootbag that after 3-8 hours of waiting (or paying to open immediately), rewards us with equipment pieces for our character. We need multiple of the same piece to level it up - just like in Clash Royale.
The matchmaking system uses a league mode, which means we should - theoretically - always be matched against players on our own level, but my biggest concern is the one-time-use powerful "strings" that can be bought through iAPs. They will inevitably ruin the fairness of the PvP.
Google Play: Here
YouTube First Impressions / Review: Here

PewDiePie's Pixelings [Total Game Size: 490 MB] (free)

Genre: RPG / Strategy / Turn-based / PvP - Requires Online Access
Orientation: Portrait
Required Attention: Full
tl;dr review:
Pixelings is PewDiePie's new strategy turn-based RPG where we defeat level after level with a team of - mostly - PewDiePie-related characters, level up our team, and fight other players in real-time PvP.
During combat, our Pixelings automatically charge up and attack, whereas we spend our time on re-positioning, or even switching out, our Pixelings to optimize damage output and prevent dying. A system that would be really interesting, if not the combat was insanely slow-paced.
Between combat, we wait for lootboxes to open to acquire more of the same Pixeling, so that they can be leveled up and grow stronger.
Monetization means the PvP is pay-to-progress-faster, but you can't buy anything you can't also grind through normal gameplay - if you have the patience. Lots and lots of patience!... Oh, and there's an energy system too. Yuck...
Google Play: Here
YouTube First Impressions / Review: Here
Google Sheet of all games I've played so far (searchable and filter-able): https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1bf0OxtVxrboZqyEh01AxJYUUqHm8tEfh-Lx-SugcrzY/edit?usp=sharing
TL;DR Video Summary (with gameplay) of last week's 4 games: https://youtu.be/Au-wMxdx9Qc
Episode 001 Episode 002 Episode 003 Episode 004 Episode 005 Episode 006 Episode 007 Episode 008 Episode 009 Episode 010 Episode 011 Episode 012 Episode 013 Episode 014 Episode 015 Episode 016 Episode 017 Episode 018 Episode 019 Episode 020 Episode 021 Episode 022 Episode 023 Episode 024 Episode 025 Episode 026 Episode 027 Episode 028 Episode 029 Episode 030 Episode 031 Episode 032 Episode 033 Episode 034 Episode 035 Episode 036 Episode 037 Episode 038 Episode 039 Episode 040 Episode 041 Episode 042 Episode 043 Episode 044 Episode 045 Episode 046 Episode 047 Episode 048 Episode 049 Episode 050 Episode 051 Episode 052 Episode 053 Episode 054 Episode 055 Episode 056 Episode 057 Episode 058 Episode 059 Episode 060 Episode 061 Episode 062 Episode 063 Episode 064 Episode 065 Episode 066 Episode 067 Episode 068 Episode 069 Episode 070 Episode 071 Episode 072 Episode 073 Episode 074 Episode 075 Episode 076 Episode 077 Episode 078 Episode 079 Episode 080 Episode 081 Episode 082 Episode 083 Episode 084 Episode 085 Episode 086 Episode 087 Episode 088 Episode 089 Episode 090 Episode 091 Episode 092 Episode 093 Episode 094 Episode 095 Episode 096 Episode 097 Episode 098 Episode 099 Episode 100 Episode 101 Episode 102 Episode 103 Episode 104 Episode 105 Episode 106 Episode 107 Episode 108 Episode 109 Episode 110 Episode 111 Episode 112 Episode 113 Episode 114 Episode 115 Episode 116 Episode 117 Episode 118 Episode 119 Episode 120 Episode 121 Episode 122 Episode 123 Episode 124 Episode 125 Episode 126 Episode 127
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Ways for Couples to Connect during Sheltering in Place

Ways for Couples to Connect during Sheltering in Place

https://preview.redd.it/u2qg5zv7gls41.jpg?width=2560&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=4bca15d0fc37f1379284d60e42426890228a3ed3
I’m sure all the streaming services are going to be well used during this time. Many people will binge on shows they have missed and movies they have wanted to watch. Yet, it’s also a great opportunity to do other things together and to even get to know each other more. Couples and families can actually use this time to build fond memories. And to be honest, down the road, when this is over we aren’t going to look back and say “Hey, remember during the COVID-19 shelter in place when we binge watched tv…that really brought us closer together.” Take a moment to look at the videos online from Italy and how creative they have been in connecting through music and playing sports window to window…those are memories that will bring neighbors closer for years to come.
So, what can we do, while we are hunkered down and working to keep ourselves and communities safe? I have brainstormed a list here so you don’t have to, some of the ideas are silly, some more serious, but all give you the opportunity to create memories, connection and hope during these surreal times. Some you can do alone, as a couple or with the whole family. Also, if you don’t like anything here you can come up with your own.
One thing that may be fun is to write the ideas you like down on individual pieces of paper and put them in a bag or jar. Then when you get bored, pull one out and do whatever it says…you will be bound to have some fun, laugh and create memories and connection during this difficult time.
75 Creative ways to spend time while sheltering in place:
  1. Get creative with technology. Have a double-date or an outing with friends and family through video apps like Zoom.
  2. Bake or cook together
  3. Draw together, you don’t have to be artistic to do this. In fact, it may even be more fun if you aren’t because it brings more humor into it. Maybe even draw portraits of each other.
  4. Dance together. Put on some music, whether it’s slow or upbeat…just have some fun. If you have kids include them. You don’t have to dance well, just have fun.
  5. Listen to new music and talk about what you like and don’t like. Share your favorite song right now and ask each other questions about them. Why do they like it? What emotion does it bring up? Does it bring up a specific memory?
  6. Exercise together. You can do this in serious ways by running or looking for intense programs online. You can also do it in a silly, fun way. Each of you look up “weird workouts” individually and then try them together. I’m sure you will laugh.
  7. Get outside. Spend some time on a patio, balcony, or yard. Breathe fresh air. Point out things you notice in your environment. Do the 5 Senses Count down.
  8. Build a fort together and watch a movie in it.
  9. If you have an outdoor space, play a game, Frisbee, horse shoes, catch, etc. If you have a tent go camping outside.
  10. Make a funny video or a music video together.
  11. Pick some home projects you have been putting off, put some music on and be productive together.
  12. Listen to a new audio book or podcast together. Talk about it.
  13. Plan a future trip together.
  14. Play a board game.
  15. Do a puzzle.
  16. Play strip poker.
  17. Appreciate the sky. Watch a sunset or sunrise, look for shapes in the clouds, at night look for stars.
  18. Have fun with Nerf war with the kids…or without the kids. Set up a Nerf shooting range. Use paper to make targets, set up toys or lightweight items to shoot down.
  19. Sculpt with playdoh.
  20. Use clean socks, roll them up individually and have a “snowball” fight.
  21. Do a blindfolded taste test to see how many foods you can each guess correctly.
  22. Get in your PJs and have breakfast in bed for dinner.
  23. Write a story together, one person starts with 1-2 sentences and then the next person continues it…you can go around and around until you feel done. This is great to do as a family.
  24. One person draws a cartoon and then the other person adds the words.
  25. Send a surprise package to someone you know.
  26. Read a book together or even start a book club with finds online.
  27. Look up fun science experiments you can do at home
  28. Have a picnic inside or outside.
  29. Each individually picks a documentary or Ted Talk and then watch them together. Tell your partner why you picked it and then each share your thoughts about it. What was surprising? What did you find interesting? What feelings did it bring up?
  30. Use what you have in your closet and have a dress up party.
  31. Have a thumb or leg wrestling competition, the winner picks the movie, game or movie.
  32. Interested in getting a pet? Spend time researching them together.
  33. Play indoor hockey or golf. Set up goals or holes (cups) to shoot into. You can use brooms and mops as sticks and a cotton ball or a rolled-up sock as the ball.
  34. Find a new video game to play together or to play online with friends.
  35. Social Media or Screen detox.
  36. Visit a museum, aquarium or zoo online.
  37. Lip-Sync or karaoke using YouTube or a music streaming program, grab a hair brush or spoon as a mic and go to town. Sing solo, sing together and have fun.
  38. Declutter something. A junk door, closet, cabinet; you will leave sheltering in place feeling lighter
  39. Write love letters to each other.
  40. Write a story about what you remember about your first date and how you remember feeling.
  41. Take the love language test, share your results and share more specific examples.
  42. Take an online class together. Learn a new language, a cooking class, art class.
  43. Take a temperament test and share your results: Enneagram, Myers Briggs, there are a lot out there.
  44. Give each other massages.
  45. Have fun with questions. There are tons of links online for questions to ask on date night, so you don’t even have to be creative.
  46. Document your experience through this time. Create your own “captains log”, use pictures and videos. Be serious, be silly.
  47. Try meditation. There are YouTube videos and apps that can take you through guided meditations.
  48. Learn about mindfulness and practice it.
  49. Purge…look for things to donate. Clothes, shoes, home goods.
  50. Color in a coloring book or print out a free coloring page for each other to color.
  51. Make a list of your favorite 10 memories and share them.
  52. Take dance lessons using YouTube.
  53. Make a couple’s or individual bucket list.
  54. Make a vision board for what you want the rest of your year to look like. Apps like “Wishboard” are great but you can use old magazines too.
  55. Teach each other a skill the other doesn’t have. I don’t know how to BBQ so maybe I will have my husband teach me. I know more about home improvement so I can teach him something there.
  56. Tell each other jokes, riddles or ghosts’ stories.
  57. Make a time capsule of your time together, write letters to each other. Pick a date in the future to open it. You can use a box or bag but seal it, date it and sign it. Then put it somewhere safe and set a reminder on your calendar to open it.
  58. Have a paper airplane competition. Bet something that the winner gets.
  59. Think and plan a few random acts of kindness you can do now or in the future.
  60. Play a trivia game.
  61. Go window shopping online for something you want to save for.
  62. Make an indoor scavenger hunt.
  63. Play a game from childhood: hide and seek, charades, truth or dare, would you rather
  64. Build a Lego set.
  65. Play balloon volleyball.
  66. Learn a magic trick and entertain each other.
  67. Tell each other about your favorite childhood books and retell each other what you remember about the story. Share a memory you have of reading the book or who read it to you. What feelings does it bring up?
  68. Make a list of local restaurants and activities you want to do when life returns to “normal”
  69. Watch comedians online; laughter is so important during times of stress.
  70. Re-watch your favorite movies. From childhood or more recent. Talk about what you like about it. Anything you notice this time that you didn’t see before. How old were you when you first saw it? What was going on during that time?
  71. Spend time cuddling and exploring each other’s bodies
  72. Read and try this article, “The 36 Questions That Lead to Love you will ask 36 specific questions and then make eye contact for 4 minutes. Once you are done, share your experience with your partner.
  73. Incorporate a new habit. It’s said it takes 30 days to establish a new habit…you have the time.
  74. Practice gratitude. Watch our blog on the Top Three. A great way to learn about and practice being mindful and grateful.
  75. BREATHE! Learn how to take deep calming breaths, do it alone, with your partner or as a whole family
BONUS TIP: If you are struggling and need support, reach out for information about online sessions and a free 20 minute consultation. We can help!
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MEGA GUIDE to The International 2019 in Shanghai, China!

Comprehensive Guide for Shanghai TI9 Visitors

Heya /dota2, your resident bilingual Dota fan here, who brought you Chinese memes and interview translations over the past few TI's. With the advent of The International 9, many fans who are looking to attend the event live but have never visited Shanghai would understandably have many questions and concerns regarding the city. This guide was painstakingly written by yours truly to give ya'll an idea of what to expect during your visit and answer some common questions and concerns. Be warned that this is a REALLY long guide (9k words, no biggie) aimed towards first timers in Shanghai, if you’re a ticket holder and this is your first time visiting, make sure to read the whole thing as a fair few parts are interconnected.
 
If you have any specific questions that this guide doesn’t cover, feel free to ask any questions in the comments section or via the Shanghai TI9 Discord.
 

Introduction

Shanghai is one of the largest cities in the world, with a population of more than 24 million. Situated along China’s eastern coastline, Shanghai has a warm temperate climate, with July and August being our hottest months averaging 25-35 degrees Celsius. Rainy season usually ends by late June so we would expect typical hot summer weather during the event period, so dress accordingly.
 
Air pollution in Shanghai has seen a drastic reduction since 2010 in an effort to improve the city's image. Despite this improvement, it is still considered fairly polluted by global standards, and sensitive people might experience respiratory irritation, though if you’re from a developed city you probably won’t notice much difference. Also, indoor smoking has been recently banned in Shanghai, so smoking is only allowed in open-air environments or designated smoking areas.
 
In terms of commodity costs, China isn't as cheap as it used to be, and Shanghai’s definitely on the pricey end of the scale. That being said, you can always find a good deal on accommodation and food if you’re resourceful enough, though you might need a local friend to help you with that.
 
Compared to other parts of China, Shanghai has one of the highest overall prevalence of English speakers. Younger generations have at least a rudimentary grasp of English, and there’s a fairly large number of proficient users. Communication for basic things like directions and purchases shouldn’t be an issue.
 
One thing to note is that Shanghai isn’t just a tourist location for you, it’s a tourist hotspot for the rest of China as well. There’s easily a couple million domestic tourists in Shanghai on any given day, and to them, YOU are a tourist attraction, so try not to be bothered by the looks and attention. People in China are generally very welcoming and friendly towards foreigners, so if you’re in a pinch, just ask for help from passer-bys (particularly younger folk).
 

Preparations

1. Visa
Before one books a flight to Shanghai, first thing you will need to do is look up the Visa application process to obtain a tourist visa to China. China’s visa application process is pretty straightforward without any particular hurdles, just fill up the relevant forms and attach the required documents. The main items you will need to prepare for the application would be your flight itinerary and hotel booking. Please note that in some countries, you may have to submit the application form in person or via mail to specific visa application centers, so make sure you do your research on the due process beforehand.
 
[Cost]
Visa cost may vary between countries, usually ranging between USD$90 – 110, though I’ve seen some places pricing it at 150. Agency fees will apply if you apply through a travel agent, but that may be preferred to simplify the process if you find it hard to navigate through the embassy resources.
 
[Duration]
Officially, visa processing time is slated to be 10-14 days, but it can often be processed as quickly as 2-3 days, depending on how busy the embassy is. Again, check with your country’s authorities, you may have to return to the visa application center to pick-up your passport/visa.
 
[Misc]
Singapore, Brunei and Japan passport holders can enter China without a visa for a stay no more than 15 days. For those of you from countries with powerful passports, you may be unused to the paperwork to fill out, but it’s pretty simple to handle and shouldn’t take more than 15 minutes of your time.
 
2.Flight
For flight booking, simply use your preferred website, skyscanner, booking, etc, to find the lowest fare available.
Shanghai is a cosmopolitan city so there wouldn’t be any problems booking flights there, Pudong Airport is one of the busiest airports in the world. Note however that there are two airports in Shanghai, Pudong International Airport (PVG) and HongQiao International Airport (SHA). Nowadays, HongQiao Airport is mostly for domestic flights, but if you’re flying from Eurasia, your flight may transit via another major inland city in China, which will possibly land you in HongQiao. If you’re travelling with friends via different flightpaths, make sure everyone’s booking to the right airport, because the two airports are pretty far apart on opposite ends of the city.
 
Should the air tickets to Shanghai be in short supply, alternative flight routes include flying to Hangzhou or Nanjing and taking a high speed rail to Shanghai. The high speed rail service in China is world-class and easy to navigate (do inquire if you’re going for this option, I’ll add another section if it’s in high demand), and it’s less than 2 hours travel time via the rail to Shanghai. If you wish to take this chance to tour around China a bit, this would be a good choice as you can visit multiple cities and see their unique history, culture and attractions (such as West Lake in Hangzhou).
 
3.Venue:
Before we get to the hotel and accommodations, the venue needs to be looked at since I’m sure a lot of you will be looking to stay somewhere nearby. First off, here’s a google map of the venue and its surroundings.
The stadium is conveniently located right beside a Metro station, China Art Museum Station. You will see the iconic Mercedez Benz Arena (MBA) building immediately when you step out of the station via exit 4 (I've personally verified it), and it is a mere 30 second walk to the stadium.
 
Located along the bank of the Huangpu River, the MBA is part of the expo grounds developed during the 2010 World Expo in Shanghai. It boasts spectacular views of the city and the river, has a gorgeous park right next to it where you can go for a leisurely stroll, stunning architecture in every direction and rows upon rows of restaurants available in the adjacent River Mall Area 5. The entire area was developed for event purposes and its facilities are specifically constructed to cater to those needs.
 
HOWEVER, this also means that there are no hotels or residences within the immediate vicinity, since the district was entirely purposed as exhibition grounds. The nearest available accommodation would be budget hotels approximately 1km away, with decent hotels (4-stars) at least 1.5km away. Given how efficient the Shanghai Metro is, it is strongly recommended that you widen your hotel search radius and take advantage of the Metro system.
 
Please also note that food and drinks are not allowed to be brought into the Arena. While there is some leeway for small finger foods and mineral water, it is up to the discretion of the organizers/guards (i.e. if the venue ends up being a mess on day 1, they might enforce a stricter ban day 2 onwards. Keep the venue clean everyone!). Things like a Mcdonalds takeout bag are definitely not allowed. Food and drinks are available for sale inside the Arena, but at a hefty premium compared to standard local retail prices. For reference, a bottle of water sold inside would be about 15-18 rmb (2.50 USD), a grilled sausage is 10rmb (1.50 USD) etc.
 
4. Hotels/Accommodation
In a city of 24 million, hotels are aplenty around Shanghai, with options available across all prices. As a reminder, your passport is mandatory for checking into any public accommodation in Shanghai, be it hotels or AirBnB. Also, while AirBnB is rising in Shanghai, unless you have a local friend helping you out, you may encounter communication issues with due processes during your stay, hence I would recommend sticking to hotels where formality is assured.
[Edit] I've been informed that due to the new recycling laws enacted in July, budget and mid-range hotels no longer provide bathroom amenities by default, but are available on request. Please remember to ask for them before flaming them!
 
[Location Selection]
The main priority you would have when choosing a hotel for the TI event would be the ease of commute to the venue. It is highly recommended that you search for a hotel that is close to a Metro line. To recap for those who skipped straight to this section, it is due to these main reasons:
 
The Arena’s station lies on Line 8 (blue line), which runs vertically through the city. You can reduce the hassle of changing lines by selecting accommodation solely along this metro line, but it would limit your options. I recommend that you use the map view when booking your hotels on your booking site of choice and try to find hotels within walking distance of a metro station (which honestly isn't hard because of the extensive metro coverage - see transportation section).
The main locations where hotel prices are higher would be in the strip stretching from People’s Square to LuJiaZui (highlighted in yellow in the above link), due to their premium location in the heart of Shanghai’s iconic tourist hotspots. Beyond these areas, hotel prices are generally fairly uniform across the city.
 
[Hotel Grades & Chains]
i.Budget hotels (USD 35-70)
While there are even cheaper options, I would not recommend them as they run the risk of being sketchy motels or hostels with nothing but a bed. Most of them likely won’t have English-speaking staff either, and honestly you likely won’t find them on international booking sites, so don’t worry.
There are a few budget hotel chains in Shanghai, such as HANTING and JINJIANG. These are typical budget hotels offering a simple room with standard utilities and daily room service, but likely do not include breakfast nor any sort of catering service (they might on the upper price end). Note that even within the same hotel chain, the quality of the hotel may vary significantly, so keep an eye on the photos when booking. In some low-budget cases, the room might not have an exterior window, but gaming addicts don’t need sunlight anyway.
 
ii.Midrange Hotels (USD 70-120)
This is where you’ll find some international brands like Holiday Inn. These hotels are generally 3-4 star caliber, and would match international standards in terms of room quality. Typical hotels, not much to comment about them.
 
iii.Luxury Hotels (USD 120+)
As a cosmopolitan city, Shanghai sports luxury hotels from all international hotel chains, such as Mariott, Ascott, Intercontinental etc. Beyond the luxuries these hotels offer, they are usually situated in shopping hubs or tourist hotspots, and you can be assured that they would have staff proficient in English. A personal recommendation I would make is the Jumeirah Himalayas Hotel, which is absolutely stunning and located right next to Metro line 7, taking a mere 25 minutes to arrive at the Mercedes-Benz Arena.
 
If you have any queries or questions about the hotel you’re booking, feel free to ask on Discord where Shanghai locals (myself included) will be able to answer you.
 
5.VPN and Data Plans
Due to censorship laws and the Great Firewall of China, many commonly used social media platforms and search engines are blocked and/or throttled in China. Facebook, Google, Snapchat, Twitter, Youtube are all completely blocked. Google translate and maps are usable (via its Chinese platform translate.google.cn and maps.google.cn), Whatsapp is kinda-sorta banned but messages do go through occasionally (pictures and media definitely can’t). Reddit’s in the same boat, it’s banned but… sometimes it’s not? Anyway, bottomline is, if you want to access the internet as you do back home, there are two options:
  1. Your home country’s local carrier has global roaming, and you’re fine with coughing up the dough for usage abroad. Check with your service provider to see if this is available. If you’re visiting for a short duration (i.e. main event only), this would be a good choice and price would vary based on your mobile plan. Because you’re using the network provided by your own country’s carrier, the global roaming is NOT subject to the firewall and you’d retain full access to the internet, which saves a lot of hassle.
  2. If you use a network in China, such as connecting to local wifi/using a local sim card you purchased, you will have to utilize a VPN to access the blocked content. Contrary to popular belief, VPNs are NOT illegal to use in China. (What is illegal is if you sell a VPN service as a corporate entity without approval granted by the authorities). There are tons of VPNs available on the market, however the GFW is no slouch and do periodic banwaves that kills of a bunch every now and then. Make sure you do careful research on which ones are reliably usable before purchasing; the free ones tend to be either shady (data selling) or unreliable (unusable/poor connection). If you use a VPN service, make sure to install and ensure that it is working first before arriving in Shanghai, as those service providers’ websites might be blocked.
 
Protip: If you’re a University student, look up your university’s tech resources to see if they have a uni-access VPN for students abroad, particularly if your university has a strong Asian demographic. Given the large number of Chinese students abroad and the endemic problem of being unable to access University resources whilst on holidays back home, many Unis have set up official VPNs for use by their Chinese students, which you can make use of in this instance. Most US/CA/UK/AU institutions have this function and you can look it up.
 
6. Apps to prepare
  1. Google Translate: Your best buddy if mandarin is basically moonrunes for you. Helps with basic communication which should cover most things you’ll encounter on your trip.
  2. Pleco: Your second best buddy to help with communication, comes with voice functions, optical character recognition functions (when you see a signboard and have no clue what it means and you can’t type it out either), handwriting input (you can draw moonrunes into it) and many other functions that helps you overcome the language barrier
  3. Didi: Basically Chinese Uber. Allows foreign credit card payment so one of the rare few apps that foreigners can work with. Visa/Mastercard/UnionPay only, not sure about AMEX.
  4. Wechat: Chinese Whatsapp and Facebook rolled into one, you should set it up beforehand. This is THE most used app in China, just about everyone uses it and it is an essential means of communication. If you meet anyone you want to stay in touch with, add them through Wechat and you’re good to go. Perhaps someday you might even discover the fabled meme trove of China that is Wechat Stickers…
 
7.Money
This warrants a special section because Shanghai has a unique case of being an essentially “Cashless” city. E-commerce is the predominant form of transaction in Shanghai, with virtually everyone making payments and transfers via wallet apps such as Alipay and Wechat. This has resulted in much lower amounts of circulated cash, and oftentimes small retails and cabbies may not hold enough spare change since barely anyone uses cash these days. While highly convenient, this becomes a challenge for foreign visitors as the process for linking the wallet app to a credit card requires verification from a local bank.
There are a few ways one can make payments in China:
  1. Domestic payment platforms such as Wechat/Alipay, if you are able to complete the verification process. This may be possible for some SEA nations with banks that are partnered with Unionpay.
  2. Some international payment platforms such as ApplePay, SamsungPay are also accepted at larger chains (Starbucks, Mcdonalds etc)
  3. Credit Cards are accepted at most large retail outlets, stores and restaurants, but some cards may not be accepted (Visa/Mastercard/Unionpay are fine)
  4. Cash – ATM’s around the city do cater to foreign cards but there are transaction costs and withdrawal limits, I believe it’s around 2000 RMB per transaction (300USD) for foreign cards.
See also the section on transportation below for further information regarding travel payments.
 

Arrival in Shanghai

Once you have made the necessary preparations for your trip to Shanghai, next comes the part where you plan what to do while you’re here.
 
1.Airport Services
There are a few things to take note of when you arrive at the Shanghai Airport. Security is pretty standard per international standards, and you won’t be subjected to TSA-style unsolicited colonoscopies. You may be requested to open your bags for a brief inspection, so please do not attempt to smuggle contraband (see section on China Law). If the border officer asks the purpose of your visit and doesn’t understand e-sports, just tell them you’re here to attend an exhibition.
PSA due to recent bs on worldnews: No, you will NOT be asked to hand over your phone or electronic devices. No, you will not have any bullshit spyware forcibly installed on your phones, apple/google already did that for you. No, security doesn’t give a shit if you have porn on your devices. These measures are only applied to specific border crossings in one specific part of western China that is prone to conflict, and do not apply to 99% of China’s ports.
Once you leave the gates, there might be a swathe of tourist peddlers asking if you need a cab, do make sure to ignore them and just follow the signs to the public transport facilities. The information desks at the airport all have English assistance so you can look to them for help. There are 3 main transportation options from Pudong Airport to the city – Cabs, Metro and the Maglev, as follows:
1. Cabs/Uber: The fare from Pudong Airport to the venue is approximately 150RMB (22USD), subject to variation based on time (night rate, peak hour jams etc). Depending on where your hotel is, you can approximate what your fare would likely be. I recommend that you print out the hotel address (In Chinese characters) for easy navigation with the driver.
2. Metro: Metro lines are available in both HongQiao and Pudong Airports, and easily accessed after exiting the gates. This is by far the cheapest option, costing a mere 3 – 5 RMB a trip (45-75 cents), though you will likely be facing a rather packed train. If you’re looking to minimize costs or if your hotel is near a metro line, this is the recommended way, though you will have to navigate your way through the metro map to the right station.
3. Maglev: The Shanghai Magnetic Levitation Rail, available only in Pudong Airport, is a short-distance rail that takes you from the Airport to Longyang Station, a transport hub close to the city. Costing 40 RMB (6 USD) for a ticket, the Maglev is a state-of-the-art transport that goes up to 430+ kph, covering the 30+ km (19miles) between stations in 7 minutes (which the metro line would otherwise take 40 minutes to traverse). If this is your first time in Shanghai, I highly recommend taking it at least once for the experience, not just for the speed but also that surreal /futurology moment when the magnets hum to life and you feel the train levitating.
 
2.Currency Exchange
Next thing you might worry about is currency exchange. In the case that you did not prepare local currency, there is a currency exchanger in the airport; however the airport rates tend to be pretty pricey. In China, currency exchange is government controlled, which means there are no private retail currency exchangers as one might find in other countries. Instead, all currency exchange are performed through the banks. The bank’s rates all uniformly follow the central bank’s rate, which is highly competitive, and in most cases the exchange rate will likely be far better than in your own countries due to regulations against banks placing a premium on currency exchange. You may have to bring your passport to prove your identity, but beyond that you won’t need to worry about any procedural obstacles. A yearly exchange cap of US$50,000 per person applies for foreign cash exchange (does not apply to credit card transactions), but I don’t think that would apply to most of us attending the event.
 
3.Transport
A. UbeDiDi
Didi, which is basically Chinese Uber, is the go-to app in Shanghai for vehicular transport. There are other alternative apps but Didi is the most integrated in terms of english availability and, more importantly, allows use of international visa/mastercard credit payment.
While Didi is a very convenient mode of transport around Shanghai, do note that it may not be the best choice for the event, as you’re looking at over 15,000 people leaving the venue at the close of each day, of which a sizable portion will be hailing private fares. If you rely on Didi/Uber, you might find yourself placed 200+ in the queue with an estimated wait time of over 2 hours… which is why I recommend seeking public transport to the venue.
 
B. Public Transport – Metro
The Shanghai Metro is the most convenient form of transport in the city. With a huge network spanning across the city, there are few places in the metropolitan area that are beyond a 15 minute walk from any given station. One of the most efficient systems in the world, the Metro runs at intervals of approximately 3 minutes, down to 30 seconds during peak hours (commuters wanted more but safety concerns limited the frequency), so you don’t have to worry about missing one. Most lines operate between 5am to 11pm, with Line 2 (which connects to the airports/railway stations) running as late as 1.30am. During the late hours though, taxis/didi would be your only option.
 
All stations have signs in both English and Mandarin so you shouldn’t have many issues navigating your way around, though you should take note of which exit you want to take as some major stations can have over 20 exits and span a long distance. The metro can be really packed during peak hours – while not at Japan levels of sardine packing, you may find yourself queueing and missing a few trains before being able to board one yourself. Peak hours is usually 8am-9:30am and 5pm-6:30pm.
 
To use the Metro, you will need to purchase a Public Transport Card which looks like THIS. The card can be purchased at any metro station including the airport and costs 20 RMB (3 USD) that can be refunded upon return. You can then top up the card with whatever value needed. Do note that the Public Transport Card is usable across all official public transport (Metro, Buses, Official Taxis, Maglev) which makes it particularly convenient as you won’t have to worry about spare change, you can pay by just scanning the card, so keep that in mind when topping it.
When refunding the card at the station upon leaving the country, do note that there will be a 5% surcharge on refunds above 10 RMB when returning the card.
 
C. Public Transport – Taxi
There are a few different taxi companies in Shanghai, but the main reputable ones are 大众 (Cyan colour), 强生(Yellow or Red colour). The main taxi companies are affiliated with the Department of Transportation, allowing them to accept payment via the public transport card as described above. It is highly recommended to obtain a card for this purpose as many Taxi drivers might not keep much spare change for cash transactions, given the cashless city phenomenon. You can also book a taxi directly using Didi, which may sometimes be faster than finding a dedicated driver.
 
Change Taxi's if the taxi does not have a meter or if the driver asks to keep the fare off-meter. Do note however that it is customary for the driver to not activate the meter immediately out of courtesy to the passenger – they usually activate it after driving a few meters or after completing a u-turn, so don’t be alarmed. You shouldn't have to bargain for your fare, and never pay up-front. Some drivers may prefer not to pick up foreigners due to bad experiences with past passengers (drunken fare-skipper incidents etc) and many cabs are pre-booked via booking apps, so don’t be surprised when an empty cab appears to ignore you.
 
Unfortunately, most taxi drivers will not understand the slightest bit of English, so if you don't speak Mandarin, it's very useful to have a 'taxi card'. Most hotels will provide you with one, which contains the hotel's address for your return trip. It's best to keep small bills or change for taxi's, as taxi drivers won't usually have change. Taxi drivers do not expect a tip, nor will they ask for one, but they do appreciate if you round up the bill / forego the change.
 
D. Relevant Traffic laws and customs:
Shanghai is notorious for its cutthroat driving etiquette where many drivers don’t use blinkers and the right of way goes to whoever gives less fucks. While the traffic culture has improved over the years with increased traffic police oversight, there are still many things that may take visitors for a surprise. If in doubt, stick to a crowd and you’ll be fine.
First off is the right-turn rule in China, where cars can do a right turn (small turn) on a red light. So if you’re at a traffic junction, don’t assume safety of passage once the pedestrian light turns green, take note of your surroundings for ignorant drivers to ensure it is safe to cross. Alternatively, stick to a crowd and you’ll be fine.
Secondly, there are a lot of cyclists/scooterists in Shanghai, and they have a tendency to think themselves above traffic laws with their maneuverability. I can’t count the number of times I’ve had a close shave with some asshole on a scooter blatantly ignoring a red light. There are bicycle lanes on most roads around Shanghai, so keep an eye out there when crossing roads, or just stick to a crowd and you’ll be fine.
 
4.Food
Being a cosmopolitan city, Shanghai caters to all sorts of tastes and preferences when it comes to food. Local signature dishes include steamed soup dumplings, pan-fried buns, soysauce braised pork, baked sweet potato, drunken chicken and many others, while also sporting some of the best hotpots around. There are also innumerable restaurants serving foreign cuisines, ranging from Japanese, Korean, Western, Indian and various Southeast Asian cultures. There are restaurants that cater to vegetarians and halal requirements, and if all else fail, we have the bastions of American nutrition, McDonalds/KFC/Burger King.
 
[Food Hygiene and Sanitation]
One might be understandably concerned about the sanitary conditions of food in China. Shanghai’s town council has aggressively tightened hygiene regulations over the past years, particularly after major food scandals which pretty much killed the street food business due to public fear (unethical assholes ruining things for everyone as usual). While there are definitely seedy places out there with questionable sanitation, you would be perfectly safe sticking to larger establishments. As a rule of thumb, find places with a decent crowd and you’re good to go. Largefancier restaurants are very safe as they do have a reputation to maintain, and most expat/tourist areas are closely vetted; generally if the restaurant has a budget for English menus it’s pretty safe.
 
[Water]
Tap water in Shanghai needs to be boiled before consumption. Your hotel should have complementary drinks (you can always ring the reception for more, though budget/midrange hotels might limit it at two per day) and there is no shortage of convenience stores across the city where you can purchase drinks.
 
[Exotic Foods]
Shanghai’s on the moderate end of the scale when it comes to exotic foods, so you won’t be finding some of the more extreme foodstuffs that shows up on fear factor. If you’re feeling adventurous during your stay however, you can try some of the local delicacies which oftentimes involve parts considered unusual in western culinary cultures. Braised chicken feet (called Phoenix Claws) is a hugely popular dish, along with pork liver, blood pudding, pork ears, ox tail soup and many more. China has a rich culinary culture with many recipes passed down over innumerable generations, and many dishes have some sort of background story behind them.
 
[Tipping]
Some restaurants refuse tips, mostly because they’re unused to it and are accustomed to fully returning your change. However, tipping is becoming more common in the city, but mainly in high-end restaurants where a 10-15% service charge may be added to the bill. Elsewhere it is not expected.
 
[Misc]
While food in Shanghai’s metropolitan area is quite clean by international standards, it is recommended that visitors bring some diarrhea medication along just in case of upset stomachs. For allergies, there are over-the-counter medications available in local pharmacies, but anything with adrenalin or corticosteroid (epipens etc) will require a doctor’s prescription at the hospital. (See section on Medical Services)
For street food/small eateries, unless you have a Chinese E-wallet app, you will likely have to use cash payments as vendors may not have SWIFT payment available, so keep some loose change on you.
 
5.Alcoholic Beverages
The legal drinking age in China is 18, and the Chinese are no strangers to the world’s favorite poison. Most restaurants serve beers which tend to be local brews like Tsingtao pale lager, priced around USD$1.5-3 a bottle. If you prefer western drinks, there are also several western bars in Shanghai, usually clustered around expat areas. A quick google search of shanghai bars will give you a rough idea of where they are, these places tend to be streetfront and very popular so you don’t have to worry about seedy joints. Keep in mind though that imported drinks will have a hefty premium tagged on them if you’re buying from a bar, so don’t expect cheap prices in this regard.
 
If you’re feeling adventurous, you can try the local Baijiu (White Wine or Chinese Vodka), which is a spirit typically around 52% alcohol content (though some brands go as low as 38 and as high as 64). Keep in mind that Baijiu has a different “role” compared to western liquor - despite also being served in small glasses (about half a standard shot), it is usually consumed during a meal, as a complement to your course rather than a standalone beverage, though it also can be consumed that way.
 
Buyers beware, however, as Baijiu comes in many different varieties and grades, ranging from thousands of dollars a bottle to 4 dollars for a 5 Litre drum. Just like how vodka’s cheaper than water in Russia, some of the lower end brands are ridiculously cheap. However you get what you pay for, and I honestly cannot recommend the cheap brands in good faith, as they’re considered “fake wine” by locals (just a shitty alcohol mix, not a savory brew), so unless you’re really motivated to abuse your body and taste buds, I’d advise to stick to the more mainstream brands recommended by your Chinese peers or stores. For reference, a decent bottle would typically have a retail price of around 400+ RMB (60+USD), with more popular brands going past 800 RMB (120USD).
 
6.Sightseeing
Shanghai, being a highly developed city, has a skyline predominantly filled with skyscrapers and vast expanses of concrete jungle, so sightseeing here is a pretty similar experience to say, New York City. I’ll briefly list a few popular tourist hotspots here – there are already many tourist guides out there for Shanghai that gives you a wealth of information, so I’ll keep this section simple.
  1. The Bund - Pretty much the iconic heart of Shanghai, a must-see.
  2. Lu Jia Zui/Oriental pearl Tower – The financial center on the opposite coast of the Bund, with most of Shanghai’s iconic skyscrapers and buildings.
  3. Nanjing Road – The quintessential shopping avenue, stretching from the Bund to People’s Square (Note: You can directly take the metro from the Mercedez Benz Arena to People’s Square, then tour via People’s Square – Nanjing Road – The Bund. It’s a easily navigated path following one main road, and particularly beautiful at night. Highly recommended.)
  4. Yu Garden – Classical Chinese Garden and tourist hotspot
  5. Shanghai Museum / Shanghai Science and Technology Museum
  6. Shanghai Wild Animal Zoo – I highly recommend a visit if you can spare the time, as they feature a safari-like experience where you travel in a bus directly through an open pasture where tigers roam freely. Oh and you can purchase a live chicken to feed the tigers with.
  7. Zhujiajiao* – A classical old Chinese town with traditional Dynasty-era architecture. A fair distance away from the city center but worth a visit.
  8. SheShan* – A thematic tourist area with a huge park, golf courses, and the recently opened Intercontinental Wonderland Hotel – the hotel that is built within an abandoned quarry, featuring a unique “pit” environment as well as underwater rooms. Highly recommended for Underlord spammers.
*: As these places are fairly far from the city center, it is recommended that you seek a tour guide or tour group when visiting, if only to help with communication and navigation.
 
7.Chinese Law
This is probably the section that will attract the most memetic responses so I’ll keep it straight and simple – please be a responsible adult, as you would be when visiting ANY country. You’re here to attend an Esports event and have a good time watching some top-notch dota with the rest of the world. This enjoyment is similarly shared by everyone in the stadium regardless of race, country or culture. Everyone is here to celebrate something we all enjoy in equal measure, so please don’t let any political or cultural disagreements get in the way, because it doesn’t belong here.
That being said, there are certain laws that a visitor should keep in mind:
 
1. Drugs & Contraband
All narcotic substances are a BIG no-no here in China, and this includes marijuana. China has a zero-tolerance policy towards drugs after being subjected to massive narco-terrorism campaigns by colonial powers, which inflicted grievous damage to the nation and resulted in deep social and cultural enmity towards substance abuse. Please do not attempt to bring any narcotics into the country, even if they are legal in your home country. If caught in possession of drugs, you will be arrested on the spot, with penalties ranging from 15 days imprisonment (smoking weed) to capital punishment (trafficking heroin). This is the one line you REALLY do not want to fuck around with while in China, so don’t do it.
 
2. Censorship of politically sensitive topics
I’ll first clarify one thing: It is NOT illegal to engage in discussions about certain politically sensitive topics in China, unlike what popular opinion on /worldnews claims. However, broadcasting it would put you at risk of getting in trouble with authorities (looking at you edgelords who wants to put dumb political discourse on camera at a Dota event), as it can be considered public disruption or even instigating public unrest, which may get you detained for a couple days while your embassy sorts you out.
If you are particularly concerned about this for some reason, the below links provides a pretty good picture of what you can expect when discussing sensitive topics in China:
Link 1 Link 2
 
If it is your first time in Shanghai, you may well find the local populace to be very different from your preconceived notions, especially for younger generations who are generally more connected and well-informed of international news. I recommend that you keep an open mind coming into this beautiful city, and enjoy some awesome dota with the local fans.
 
[Cont]Nightlife/Safety/Police/Hospital
 
Due to hitting the 40,000 character cap on reddit, the remaining sections are posted in the link above. Please make sure to read them as well!
 
Again, if you have any questions, you can ask me in this thread or via PM, or through the Shanghai TI9 Discord where several locals are available constantly to answer any queries you have. You can also find more information through a quick google or youtube search, there are many resources that explains things you might encounter on a visit to Shanghai. One thing though, don’t ever use /China as a source of info, it’s a heavily biased (if not openly racist) cesspool.
 
To close things off, I hope this guide would be helpful to those of you visiting Shanghai, and it wasn't too much of a bore to read. This guide ended up being far lengthier than I predicted when I started it as a voluntary work, but it'd be worth it if it can help dota fans who are coming over from all around the world enjoy TI9 just a bit more. Shoutout to David from Newbee for keeping me on track over the past weeks and Icefrog for nerfing Doom to the point that I stopped playing Dota and could actually pump this guide out. Can you unnerf him now please?
P.S. If any team orgs would like assistance in setting up a social media presence in China on chinese platforms (to perhaps connect with and build up your chinese fanbase), do drop me a message via reddit DM!
submitted by trollogist to DotA2 [link] [comments]

4 Quick tl;dr iOS Game Reviews / Recommendations (Episode 41)

Welcome back, fellow mobile gamers. I hope the Thanksgiving / Black Friday stress is over, and if you're looking for a new game to relax with this Sunday the 1st of December - here's a few of the best I've played last week. As always, I have covered 4 mobile games this week, and this post is my documentation of what I think about each of them.
This week's episode includes a fun monster slingshot game that feels like a mix between Airhockey and Pokemon, a team-based 8bit RPG perfect for the min-maxer in all of us, a new Tennis sports game that has been taking the mobile market with storm, and lastly, PewDiePie's newest creation; a strategy RPG called PewDiePie's Pixelings.
Disagree with my opinion? Let’s have a friendly discussion below.
New to these posts? Check out the first one from 41 weeks ago here.
The games are "ranked" somewhat subjectively from best to worst, so take the ranking for what it is.

Let's get to the games:

Capsulemon, Fight! [Game Size: 354 MB] (free)

Genre: Action / Slingshot / Airhockey-like / RPG - Offline Playable
Orientation: Portrait
Required Attention: Some
tl;dr review:
Capsulemon is a "monster slingshot" game, much like "The Muscle Hustle", which means we sling our team of creatures across the airhockey-like playing field to damage opponents and trigger combo attacks.
The gameplay is fun, combat is fast-paced and looks visually pleasing, and the monsters we select for our team all feel distinct. To my big surprise, the game even features a tiered reward system WITHOUT a battle-pass subscription for additional rewards, and lootboxes that we don't have to wait to open.
PvP is real-time, but paying users can definitely pay-to-progress-faster, so I recommend sticking to the singleplayer mode until you've unlocked enough monsters and leveled them up. I hope more singleplayer content will be added in the future to accommodate those of us who love the core gameplay but don't want to worry about the fairness of PvP.
App Store: Here
First Impressions / Review: Here

Last Cloudia [Game Size: 980 MB] (free)

Genre: RPG / 16-bit / Team-based - Requires Online Access
Orientation: Portrait
Required Attention: Full
tl;dr review: [NOT GLOBALLY RELEASED]
Last Cloudia is a high-quality 16-bit team-based RPG with an above-average interesting combat system and a lot of depth to each character, making the game perfect for min-maxers.
During combat, we switch between our 3 characters at any time to use their different attacks, with the rest meanwhile being controlled by an AI. This system makes the game feel fast-paced and action-packed.
Each character's abilities have beautiful animations, and unlocking more heroes happens through a gacha system, which does mean that PvP will never be 100% fair. However, maxing out a character doesn't take more than 10-14 days, which is significantly less than other team-based RPGs, and so the monetization is on the lighter end of the spectrum for the genre.
If you want to learn more, the game has a decently sized sub-reddit with lots of beginner tips and strategies.
App Store: Here
First Impressions / Review: Here

Tennis Clash [Total Game Size: 354 MB] (free)

Genre: Tennis / Sports / Action - Requires Online Access
Orientation: Portrait
Required Attention: Full
tl;dr review:
Tennis Clash is a multiplayer 1v1 sports game with simple, fast-paced gameplay, and a Golf Battle-like high-stake combat system where we bet in-game gold to enter a match, with the winner taking it all.
I enjoyed the well-executed control system, which is easy to get used to as a casual player, yet allow us enough to control to make the game feel skill-based, which means advanced players can actually become good at the game by increasing their swiping precision and predicting the opponent's next move.
Winning a match gives us a lootbag that after 3-8 hours of waiting (or paying to open immediately), rewards us with equipment pieces for our character. We need multiple of the same piece to level it up - just like in Clash Royale.
The matchmaking system uses a league mode, which means we should - theoretically - always be matched against players on our own level, but my biggest concern is the one-time-use powerful "strings" that can be bought through iAPs. They will inevitably ruin the fairness of the PvP.
App Store: Here
First Impressions / Review: Here

PewDiePie's Pixelings [Total Game Size: 490 MB] (free)

Genre: RPG / Strategy / Turn-based / PvP - Requires Online Access
Orientation: Portrait
Required Attention: Full
tl;dr review:
Pixelings is PewDiePie's new strategy turn-based RPG where we defeat level after level with a team of - mostly - PewDiePie-related characters, level up our team, and fight other players in real-time PvP.
During combat, our Pixelings automatically charge up and attack, whereas we spend our time on re-positioning, or even switching out, our Pixelings to optimize damage output and prevent dying. A system that would be really interesting, if not the combat was insanely slow-paced.
Between combat, we wait for lootboxes to open to acquire more of the same Pixeling, so that they can be leveled up and grow stronger.
Monetization means the PvP is pay-to-progress-faster, but you can't buy anything you can't also grind through normal gameplay - if you have the patience. Lots and lots of patience!... Oh, and there's an energy system too. Yuck...
App Store: Here
First Impressions / Review: Here
Google Sheet of all games I've played so far (searchable and filter-able): https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1bf0OxtVxrboZqyEh01AxJYUUqHm8tEfh-Lx-SugcrzY/edit?usp=sharing
TL;DR Video Summary (with gameplay) of last week's 4 games: https://youtu.be/Au-wMxdx9Qc
Episode 01 Episode 02 Episode 03 Episode 04 Episode 05 Episode 06 Episode 07 Episode 08 Episode 09 Episode 10 Episode 11 Episode 12 Episode 13 Episode 14 Episode 15 Episode 16 Episode 17 Episode 18 Episode 19 Episode 20 Episode 21 Episode 22 Episode 23 Episode 24 Episode 25 Episode 26 Episode 27 Episode 28 Episode 29 Episode 30 Episode 31 Episode 32 Episode 33 Episode 34 Episode 35 Episode 36 Episode 37 Episode 38 Episode 39 Episode 40
submitted by NimbleThor to iosgaming [link] [comments]

On Circle's Edge, aka A Hater's Guide to the 2020 Professional Disc Golf Association Tour Season

Can this truly be called a Haters Guide? Well, ask yourself. Are there haters? I see haters. Is this a guide? I see a guide. So shut up and enjoy the shitposting, because it's not like there's much better going on unless you're in a hockey town or REALLY into baseball and even then, things might still be looking shit (looking at you Detroit.)

What is Disc Golf?

Disc Golf is the XFL to regular golf's NFL. Most of the stuff you like about the original, minus lot of the stuff you hate, and traditionalists need not apply.
The players? Forget all the stuffy St. Andrews shit, t-shirts khakis and sneakers are fine. The gear? Forget bulky bags and exploited caddies, grab a backpack and you're all set. The pricetag? How does top of the line discs at $25 and greens fees of nothing strike you? The broadcast? Half an hour for the front 9, half an hour for the back, only watching the players at the top that you give a shit about. The commentators? Active touring pros who don't just know the course, they're PLAYING in the tournament they do commentary for. (Example: Round 1 on Friday, comms for round 1 on Saturday morning, then an afternoon tee time for round 2, and so on) The viewing experience? We've got all the tech - hole layout drone footage, slow mo shots, shot tracers, live scoring, you name it. The courses? A beautiful mix of lush open fairways, treacherous rough where the grass goes up to your waist, looming water hazards, and stalwart trees all standing between you and the basket. Sure these guys make it LOOK easy, slinging discs a mile with a casual flick of the wrist and curling them around trees like a goddamned Wanted sequel, but it's nowhere as easy as they make it look - that's why they're pros.

The Schedule

Every week there are dozens of Disc Golf tournaments around the world. But like regular golf, we don't give a shit about most of them because they're at amateur courses for amateur players. (I say this not as a jab against the Ams, they're still shitloads better than me. But B-tier and C-tier events aren't what this Hater's Guide is about.)
In terms of tournaments we DO give a shit about, there's 20 of them: eleven Disc Golf Pro Tour events, (marked with the [DGPT] tag below) six PDGA National Tour Events, and four Major Championships.

Tier Event Dates Location
DGPT The Memorial Open February 27-March 1 Fountain Hills, AZ
DGPT Waco Charity Open March 13-15 Waco, TX
National Tour Texas State Disc Golf Championships March 27-29 Tyler, TX
DGPT Jonesboro Open April 17-19 Jonesboro, AR
National Tour Glass Blown Open April 29-May 2 Emporia, KS
National Tour Santa Cruz Masters Cup May 15-17 Santa Cruz, CA
Major US Womens Disc Golf Championship May 22-24 Orangevale-Rocklin-Auburn, CA
DGPT San Francisco Open May 29-31 San Francisco, CA
Major PGDA World Disc Golf Championships June 13-20 Ogden, UT
National Tour Beaver State Fling June 26-28 Escadata, OR
DGPT Portland Open July 3-5 Portland, OR
Major European Open July 13-16 Nokia, Finland
DGPT Great Lakes Open July 24-26 Milford, MI
DGPT Idlewild Open August 7-9 Burlington, KY
DGPT Discraft Ledgestone Insurance Open August 13-16 Eureka, IL
DGPT MVP Open at Maple Hill August 18-20 Leicester, MA
DGPT Discraft Green Mountain Championship September 3-6 Smuggler's Notch, VT
National Tour Delaware Disc Golf Challenge September 11-13 Newark, DE
National Tour Music City Open September 25-27 Nashville, TN
Major United States Disc Golf Championship October 7-10 Winthrop University - Rock Hill, SC
DGPT Disc Golf Pro Tour Championship October 16-18 Charlotte, NC
If you're not the kind to go and watch people throw frisbees live, coverage for these tournaments will be found across youtube - JomezPro has been tapped to provide Lead Card coverage for all of the listed events except for the European Open. (TheSpinTV is likely to pick up that one) Second and Third card coverage will be provided by other channels like TheSpinTV and Central Coast Disc Golf. If you ARE the kind to go and watch people throw frisbees live (SeatGeek will not help you here, sorry ad buyers) you'll quickly get addicted. Or maybe weirded out. One of the two.

The Players

Right, the part of the Hater's Guide anyone gives a fuck about. Sorry it took a while, but I have to expect that most of you know about as much about disc golf as I did this time last year, which was fuckall. Obviously there's hundreds of players in each tournament field and it would be impossible to cover all of them, so let's just skip to the people we can reasonably expect to bring home hardware this year. Obviously I can't discount an unknown having a breakout year, but the stars are stars for a reason so let's stick to them.

Paul McBeth - Discraft
Ladies and Gentlemen, if you want either a perennial favorite to cheer on a la Tiger Woods, or a villain who exemplifies everything wrong with the sport a la...Tiger Woods, look no further than Disc Golf's Reigning GOAT. In 2019 McBeth made history, leaving Innova lured by an unheard of 4 year, $250,000/year sponsorship offer by their chief rival. He rewarded them by winning two majors bringing his total to TWELVE, shooting an 18-under par round for the SECOND time (no other disc golfer has accomplished the feat on the national stage) and having one of the most dominant years in recent history. In 2020 he's primed to continue his reign, though he did suffer a foot injury over the winter and just recently was able to walk without a boot. He should be fine, but injuries have bitten PMcB before - time will tell how he bounces back.

Ricky Wysocki - Innova Champion Discs
If McBeth is the Tiger Woods of disc golf, then Ricky is the closest you get to Phil Mickelson. Charismatic, incredibly talented, has a reputation for choking away titles he's got no business choking away, among his most recent the 2019 European Open where he had a 4-stroke lead going into the final round over McBeth - it didn't hold. That said, he's an incredibly gifted athlete and has shown his fair share of resilience - carding a +8 in the first round of the 2019 world championships and still bouncing back to get second place for example. (losing by a stroke to, who else? Paul) If there's any opportunity for the raptor to pounce, don't be surprised if he does it.

Simon Lizotte - Discmania
If you give no fucks about rivalries and sponsorship drama and just want to see long bombs, may I introduce you to the German wunderkind. Eight hundred feet from tee to green? No problem, that's maybe two shots on a slow day. Five hundred feet? Hmm...let's use a fucking PUTTER, that should be the right distance. He always puts up strong performances, and he's due for a few big wins on tour - the 2019 Portland Open slipped away on the 72nd hole, so you can be sure he's hungry for it.

Eagle McMahon - Discmania
The United States and obsession with one-upsmanship -name me a better duo. Easily able to match Simon with not only the crazy distance, but the crazy lines needed to get those absurd shots to actually work. While he's been known for stupid distance, the 2019 season showed that he's added another potent weapon to his game: finesse and touch. He's also got grit, playing the last round of the USDGC with a broken finger and still putting up a solid number - but his true test will be in his ability to keep it together. That broken finger? Self-inflicted when he punched his putter after a missed tap-in. That PDXO win that Simon choked away? Eagle got into a playoff, then blew it by throwing his tee shot out of bounds on the first sudden death hole. There's a high ceiling here, but will he keep himself in check to reach it?

James Conrad - Innova Champion Discs
The Man of A Thousand Putters, James has been a staple on tour for some time, finally claiming his first major in 2019 with a very overdue USDGC victory. With that monkey off his back, expect 2020 to be much of his same style of disc golf - calm throwing, calculated aggression, and nailing tight lines through the woods that can stop the rest of the field cold. And after all the close calls last year, the man is due for an Ace on the national tour - don't be surprised if Sportscenter gets a call.

Kevin Jones - Prodigy Discs
Prodigy is not the biggest manufacturer, and they have something of a reputation among the community that their players always seem to do better once they leave. KJUSA is the biggest star they have, and while he's been...pretty good under their deal, he's not shown some of the flashes of brilliance that people have expected. He's definitely got the talent, but if this season turns flat again, we could have another scramble in the free agent market.

Emerson Keith - Latitude 64 Discs
Emerson came out of nowhere in 2018 as a massive tournament grinder, playing SIXTY-SEVEN sanctioned tournaments during that tour season - many of them smaller B-tier or C-tier events, but it clearly worked for him as he capped off 2019 with a very impressive 4th place finish at Worlds, leading for the first three rounds before finally running out of steam against Paul and Ricky. He's still young, and another big charge at a big tournament title in 2020 should be seen as much more likely than not. Sleep on this kid at your own risk.

Nate Sexton & "Big" Jeremy Koling - Innova Champion Discs
The pairing of "Big Sexy" has been the leading voice of disc golf the past few years as the primary commentary crew for JomezPro and will be this year as well. Both long time veterans of the sport, they still have the arm speed and power to crush shots and hit tight gaps. Nate proved this by winning the Las Vegas Classic last week by two strokes, and Jeremy tied for second at the USDGC last year, losing to James by a stroke. Whether they're in the booth or on the course, it's never a bad video when they're in it.

Brodie Smith - Discraft
Yes, THAT Brodie Smith. The trick shot artist, ultimate frisbee magician, Basically-Sixth-Wheel-of-Dude-Perfect Brodie Smith. He's been picked up by Discraft on a one-year sponsor's exemption, and while I can't say I EXPECT anything out of him, the dude knows frisbees inside and out, so most of the skills should transfer pretty decently. Frankly I would expect him to stay around the B-tier events, maybe pop up for the occasional A-Tier and NT, but who knows? Maybe we'll see some Dark Horse Magic. Just...you know, don't bet on it.

Paige Pierce - Discraft
Yes she's the only woman on this list. No, she's not the only woman out on the course - the Woman's professional disc golf scene is just as vibrant and competitive as the male side, and to imply otherwise would be a grave offense to their skill and dedication. They just don't get the same airtime, whether that's warranted or right is a question I'll leave to non-shitposters. What is warranted is respect for Paige's ability to hang with the big boys, matching them with position and sound play even if she isn't the biggest bomber. Discraft recognized that, and rewarded the five-time world champion with a new contract to pry her away from Dynamic Discs - allegedly the same 4x250 they gave five-time world champion Paul Mcbeth last year. I'm not saying she'll reward them with the same dominance he did...but I wouldn't be shocked if she did.

If you've been paying attention, you'll notice that yes, as I upload this the first round of the first of these 20 tournaments is live underway. Videos for round one will probably be up tomorrow afternoon, or you can use the UDisc app to check scorecards in real time. Or if you're not in a frozen over tundra, use the app to see if there's a disc golf course near you. Who knows? You probably won't be an overnight star, but you might just find a cheap hobby to get you out of the house when the Yinzer's away.
submitted by Algernone25 to UrinatingTree [link] [comments]

Ways for Couples to Connect during Sheltering in Place

Ways for Couples to Connect during Sheltering in Place

https://preview.redd.it/luxji2ehrto41.jpg?width=2560&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=2776926767718ae0e110beea768a924a6823b0bc
I’m sure all the streaming services are going to be well used during this time. Many people will binge on shows they have missed and movies they have wanted to watch. Yet, it’s also a great opportunity to do other things together and to even get to know each other more. Couples and families can actually use this time to build fond memories. And to be honest, down the road, when this is over we aren’t going to look back and say “Hey, remember during the COVID-19 shelter in place when we binge watched tv…that really brought us closer together.” Take a moment to look at the videos online from Italy and how creative they have been in connecting through music and playing sports window to window…those are memories that will bring neighbors closer for years to come.
So, what can we do, while we are hunkered down and working to keep ourselves and communities safe? I have brainstormed a list here so you don’t have to, some of the ideas are silly, some more serious, but all give you the opportunity to create memories, connection and hope during these surreal times. Some you can do alone, as a couple or with the whole family. Also, if you don’t like anything here you can come up with your own.
One thing that may be fun is to write the ideas you like down on individual pieces of paper and put them in a bag or jar. Then when you get bored, pull one out and do whatever it says…you will be bound to have some fun, laugh and create memories and connection during this difficult time.
75 Creative ways to spend time while sheltering in place:
  1. Get creative with technology. Have a double-date or an outing with friends and family through video apps like Zoom.
  2. Bake or cook together
  3. Draw together, you don’t have to be artistic to do this. In fact, it may even be more fun if you aren’t because it brings more humor into it. Maybe even draw portraits of each other.
  4. Dance together. Put on some music, whether it’s slow or upbeat…just have some fun. If you have kids include them. You don’t have to dance well, just have fun.
  5. Listen to new music and talk about what you like and don’t like. Share your favorite song right now and ask each other questions about them. Why do they like it? What emotion does it bring up? Does it bring up a specific memory?
  6. Exercise together. You can do this in serious ways by running or looking for intense programs online. You can also do it in a silly, fun way. Each of you look up “weird workouts” individually and then try them together. I’m sure you will laugh.
  7. Get outside. Spend some time on a patio, balcony, or yard. Breathe fresh air. Point out things you notice in your environment. Do the 5 Senses Count down.
  8. Build a fort together and watch a movie in it.
  9. If you have an outdoor space, play a game, Frisbee, horse shoes, catch, etc. If you have a tent go camping outside.
  10. Make a funny video or a music video together.
  11. Pick some home projects you have been putting off, put some music on and be productive together.
  12. Listen to a new audio book or podcast together. Talk about it.
  13. Plan a future trip together.
  14. Play a board game.
  15. Do a puzzle.
  16. Play strip poker.
  17. Appreciate the sky. Watch a sunset or sunrise, look for shapes in the clouds, at night look for stars.
  18. Have fun with Nerf war with the kids…or without the kids. Set up a Nerf shooting range. Use paper to make targets, set up toys or lightweight items to shoot down.
  19. Sculpt with playdoh.
  20. Use clean socks, roll them up individually and have a “snowball” fight.
  21. Do a blindfolded taste test to see how many foods you can each guess correctly.
  22. Get in your PJs and have breakfast in bed for dinner.
  23. Write a story together, one person starts with 1-2 sentences and then the next person continues it…you can go around and around until you feel done. This is great to do as a family.
  24. One person draws a cartoon and then the other person adds the words.
  25. Send a surprise package to someone you know.
  26. Read a book together or even start a book club with finds online.
  27. Look up fun science experiments you can do at home
  28. Have a picnic inside or outside.
  29. Each individually picks a documentary or Ted Talk and then watch them together. Tell your partner why you picked it and then each share your thoughts about it. What was surprising? What did you find interesting? What feelings did it bring up?
  30. Use what you have in your closet and have a dress up party.
  31. Have a thumb or leg wrestling competition, the winner picks the movie, game or movie.
  32. Interested in getting a pet? Spend time researching them together.
  33. Play indoor hockey or golf. Set up goals or holes (cups) to shoot into. You can use brooms and mops as sticks and a cotton ball or a rolled-up sock as the ball.
  34. Find a new video game to play together or to play online with friends.
  35. Social Media or Screen detox.
  36. Visit a museum, aquarium or zoo online.
  37. Lip-Sync or karaoke using YouTube or a music streaming program, grab a hair brush or spoon as a mic and go to town. Sing solo, sing together and have fun.
  38. Declutter something. A junk door, closet, cabinet; you will leave sheltering in place feeling lighter
  39. Write love letters to each other.
  40. Write a story about what you remember about your first date and how you remember feeling.
  41. Take the love language test, share your results and share more specific examples.
  42. Take an online class together. Learn a new language, a cooking class, art class.
  43. Take a temperament test and share your results: Enneagram, Myers Briggs, there are a lot out there.
  44. Give each other massages.
  45. Have fun with questions. There are tons of links online for questions to ask on date night, so you don’t even have to be creative.
  46. Document your experience through this time. Create your own “captains log”, use pictures and videos. Be serious, be silly.
  47. Try meditation. There are YouTube videos and apps that can take you through guided meditations.
  48. Learn about mindfulness and practice it.
  49. Purge…look for things to donate. Clothes, shoes, home goods.
  50. Color in a coloring book or print out a free coloring page for each other to color.
  51. Make a list of your favorite 10 memories and share them.
  52. Take dance lessons using YouTube.
  53. Make a couple’s or individual bucket list.
  54. Make a vision board for what you want the rest of your year to look like. Apps like “Wishboard” are great but you can use old magazines too.
  55. Teach each other a skill the other doesn’t have. I don’t know how to BBQ so maybe I will have my husband teach me. I know more about home improvement so I can teach him something there.
  56. Tell each other jokes, riddles or ghosts’ stories.
  57. Make a time capsule of your time together, write letters to each other. Pick a date in the future to open it. You can use a box or bag but seal it, date it and sign it. Then put it somewhere safe and set a reminder on your calendar to open it.
  58. Have a paper airplane competition. Bet something that the winner gets.
  59. Think and plan a few random acts of kindness you can do now or in the future.
  60. Play a trivia game.
  61. Go window shopping online for something you want to save for.
  62. Make an indoor scavenger hunt.
  63. Play a game from childhood: hide and seek, charades, truth or dare, would you rather
  64. Build a Lego set.
  65. Play balloon volleyball.
  66. Learn a magic trick and entertain each other.
  67. Tell each other about your favorite childhood books and retell each other what you remember about the story. Share a memory you have of reading the book or who read it to you. What feelings does it bring up?
  68. Make a list of local restaurants and activities you want to do when life returns to “normal”
  69. Watch comedians online; laughter is so important during times of stress.
  70. Re-watch your favorite movies. From childhood or more recent. Talk about what you like about it. Anything you notice this time that you didn’t see before. How old were you when you first saw it? What was going on during that time?
  71. Spend time cuddling and exploring each other’s bodies
  72. Read and try this article, “The 36 Questions That Lead to Love you will ask 36 specific questions and then make eye contact for 4 minutes. Once you are done, share your experience with your partner.
  73. Incorporate a new habit. It’s said it takes 30 days to establish a new habit…you have the time.
  74. Practice gratitude. Watch our blog on the Top Three. A great way to learn about and practice being mindful and grateful.
  75. BREATHE! Learn how to take deep calming breaths, do it alone, with your partner or as a whole family
BONUS TIP: If you are struggling and need support, reach out for information about online sessions and a free 20 minute consultation. We can help!
submitted by Couplesinstitutecics to u/Couplesinstitutecics [link] [comments]

Best New Jersey Sportsbooks Apps

When it comes to online sports betting regulation, the USA is still on its infancy. On May 2018, the Supreme Court opened the way for states to pave their own legislation regarding sports betting offers.
New Jersey was one of the first states to apply legislation on this matter, having 16 websites offering and accepting online sports wagers. Many of the websites also have Apps available so players can download them onto their devices and use them while on the go.

What to Expect from a Sportsbook App

In order to legally function in the state of New Jersey, online sportsbooks need to be licensed by the Division of Gaming Enforcement (DGE). The first step players who want to go mobile must take is, therefore, to find a fully licenced site and beware of the - still - many unregulated bookies operating on the market.
Ever since sports betting became legal in the Garden State, a huge percentage of all the money legally gambled was done either online or on mobile. Whether wagering on NBA or NFL events, Hockey or even MMA, a look at the growing list of NJ Sportsbooks Apps available in Gamble USA can show that New Jersey already has plenty of variety to choose from.

888sport, along with its sister sites 888casino and 888poker, belongs to 888 Holdings and offers an App fit for both Android and iOS.
This sportsbook has lots of options when it comes to betting, like Tennis, Nascar, English Premier League, Basketball, Bowling or all the major US leagues. It has around 3547 markets available and a great Welcome Bonus. Players who register get a risk-free bet of up to $500. This means that 888sport will give back the money of the lost bets made with the first deposit.
The sportsbook offers 24/7 customer support by email, phone and live chat and lots of payment options, from the traditional credit and debit cards to modern e-wallet solutions like Skrill or Neteller.

Draftkings is already a household name when it comes to sports betting. With roots on fantasy sports, this established company has over 10 million registered users worldwide and offers a sign-up bonus of up to $1000, made of a deposit bonus and a first bet match of $500 each.
The sportsbook app is quick to install and offers a great array of wagering chances, be it on Motorsports, Darts, Golf or Boxing. It’s available for both Android and iOS and can be contacted via live chat or email in case any issue occurs during gameplay.
When it comes to payment methods, Draftkings options are a bit limited, only having the traditional debit and credit cards and Paypal.

PointsBet is an Australian product introduced in 2019, offering dynamic betting to New Jersey sportsbook fans. The sportsbook offers a great welcome package comprised of 2 risk-free bets, each offering a $500 cashback.
The app is available for both Android and iOS and the markets on offer include soccer, darts, motorsports and even Aussie football. It also has a really good choice for NFL and NBA sports wagering and lots of betting features.
Customer support is available 24/7 and can be contacted via email, live chat and phone. Banking options, however, are not that much, with e-checks, credit and debit cards, online banking and PointsBet prepaid card available.

One of the biggest operators in the world, William Hill has been a household name for many years and almost a synonym for betting. With a long history in brick and mortars, William Hill made a transition to mobile and now also has an app taking New Jersey players by storm.
The app is available both in Android and iOS and has great wagering opportunities and features. With a responsive design, the platform offers sports betting in markets such as Hockey, Football, Golf or Baseball and lots of bet types.
The support is available 24/7 by phone, email and live chat. Banking options are a bit limited, though. Players can deposit funds via e-check, credit and debit cards, William Hill prepaid card and even visit a William Hill location in NJ. Withdrawals are a bit more tricky, as right now, they’re only available via prepaid card or on location.

Conclusion

No matter the choice of Sportsbook App, players need to bear in mind some issues before downloading any of it and start enjoying some sports wagering. Gambling in New Jersey can only be done if players are located within the borders of the state, even when playing on mobile.
Android users must also beware that Google Play does not allow any money wagering and gambling apps in the App Store in the USA. This means that Android users need to download the apps, when available, directly from the websites by following the instructions normally available.
submitted by mdrcol to u/mdrcol [link] [comments]

On Day 15 - some things that helped me along the way!

Greetings - first time posting here.. wanted to share a few tips that worked for me as I start my journey (15 days as of today!) . Over the last 5 months, I lost about $20k (US) betting on sports and some in casinos. College Football, Basketball, NFL.. you name it. It took me a while to realize how damaging it was to me financially, but also mentally.. so I decided to quit cold turkey. Yes - had SEVERAL urges, especially with the NFL and college season winding down.. (am i missing out on SURE things? How will i get my $ back if I DON'T bet??, etc) . I've had them all! So - here are some tips that i have used:
  1. I created an excel spreadsheet about 4 months ago to track my betting... that was a real eye-opener for me. I would have guessed I lost $4-5k and it's TRIPLE it.
  2. I use a "wait til later" scenario for my recent impulses. Example: Look at the game lines at 8 am for a 1 pm game.. see one I would normally bet, but tell myself you have to wait until noon to put the bet in. Then at noon I say 12:45 and then try to keep busy so I don't do it. It has worked a few times. I've even said - if you are good - you can start betting in the fall when the NFL is back.
  3. Delete any and all sport apps - ESPN, CBSsports, etc. that way - if I see a game later, I never know if I "missed out" because I didn't know the spread.
  4. I developed a mini reward system. Go a week without betting - get something nice for yourself. Maybe it's as simple as an expensive coffee vs. the crap stuff at work. Or even an ice cream. Rewards work for me. Maybe if I make it a month, I can get some new tennis shoes I have been wanting, or a new golf club. Whatever it is - make it work for you.
  5. Keep it day to day - will I falter and bet? maybe... but each day seems a little easier.
Not sure if any will work for you - but i wanted to at least share. Good luck to everyone out there. stay strong!!!
submitted by ctothemtotheatothec to GamblingAddiction [link] [comments]

The Games That Live on My Phone

Alright guys (and gals), I’m sure like some of you, my phone is my only gaming device. I dont have the time or money to keep up with the latest and greatest PCs, consoles and games, so I’ve spent some time finding what I think to be the best bang for your buck when it comes to android gaming. I don't like having to carry around a controller, so this list contains games that work flawlessly with nothing but touch controls.
So the criteria for this would be great touch controls, original(ish) games that feel like they’re at home on android, Google Play Games support (achievements, and more importantly, cloud save. Half of these games will have cloud save, unfortunately, not all of them, but that’s a different discussion), and a one time payment to unlock everything -OR- a few payments for different types of DLC. No p2w, wait times, or any of that crap.
I’ll bust the list up into different genres to make it a bit easier to navigate. I usually have all of these games on my phone, but I’ll probably make a companion list with other games I think fit the bill, but don’t exactly live on my phone as much as this collection does.
I’d also like to make a list for a smaller collection of games that require a controller, if you guys would be interested in that.
Onto the games!
Arcade:
Zen Pinball - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.zenstudios.ZenPinball
I really dig this game. If you’re a fan of pinball or the old microsoft 3D pinball, this is for you. The touch controls work great, it’s one of those games that really feels at home on a touch screen device. It has one table that you can play for free, and you can buy more tables for $0.99 to $1.99 each. Selections are pretty far and wide, from Bob’s Burgers and Archer, to Jurassic Park and Star Wars, to Doom and Fallout, and just about everything in between. There’s also tokens you can buy from $0.99 to $14.99, to exchange for a fourth ball on the tables, but I don't play with those. I think it ruins the classic 3 balls per play pinball is known for. You can turn them off in the options menu. There’s also Play Games leaderboards and achievements. No cloud save, but you don't really need it with this game.
Ridiculous Fishing - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.vlambeer.RidiculousFishing
You’ve probably heard of this game, but it’s a good one. It uses taps and turning of your phone to drop your lure as far down into the lake as you can, catch as many fish as you can on the way back up, fling them into the air and then blast them out of the sky with your weapon of choice. It’s a lot of ridiculous fun, and for me the only downside is a lack of a cloud save feature. You pay once for it and that’s it. No more IAP. At $2.49, it’s well worth the price of the of the license for this kind of fishing.
Simulation:
911 Operator - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.jutsugames.operator911
This game one of the most expensive on the list when you add the initial price and the added DLC. At $6.49 for the game, and $0.99, $2.99 and $4.99 for each of the DLCs, it’s what most people would consider pricey for a mobile game, but I’ve really enjoyed it, and feel the price is worth it for what you get. You’re a 911 operator, tasked with dispatching EMS, Police, and Fire to different situations. The calls you get are based on actual 911 calls, and you can play in any city in the world. The game even changes the types of events and calls you get based on what city you’re playing in. I’ve played in both my hometown and the city I’m currently living in, and it’s a blast. If you buy the DLCs which include more scenarios and events, and more vehicles, items, and staff to arm your teams with, this game really seems endless. The controls can take a minute to get used to, but before long you’ll be zipping around the maps dispatching fire fighters to save cats from trees in no time. Can be played both horizontally and vertically. Has Play Games achievements and leaderboards. No cloud save that I’m aware of. I’ve never uninstalled it. It also has a DEMO version so you can try before you buy.
Cook, Serve, Delicious! - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=net.vertigogaming.cookservedeliciousglp
This one is awesome. Totally stressful and extremely fun. You run a restaurant in a tower, and are tasked with setting the daily menu, cooking, cleaning, and everything in between. Juggle happy customers, health code inspections, your love life, reality tv, betting, and the daily special all with your fingertips. At its core it’s a hardcore cooking sim, originally released on PC and ported to android. Honestly I don't know how you’d play it with a mouse and keyboard or controller, as it feels so at home on a touch screen. It’s a one time purchase of $3.99 and well worth it. Unfortunately, this one has no Play Games services at all.
Pocket City - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.codebrewgames.pocketcitygame
Here’s a near perfect game for android. It is a re-imagining of sorts of classic city building games like SimCity. There’s not much to say about this one, if you’ve played SimCity you basically know what the deal is. There’s events like street races and fireworks shows you can put off to make your citizens happy, disasters like volcanoes and tornadoes to destroy their lives, and all the fun stuff in between. The game can be played vertically or horizontally which is nice, and there's a one time price of $3.99 with no IAP. There’s also a DEMO so you can try it out. Unfortunatley there’s no Play Games services, but there is a way to upload and download your maps if you change devices.
Plague Inc. - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.miniclip.plagueinc
This is one of the first games I got for android years ago, and I still play it pretty often nowadays. I’m sure you’ve all heard of this one, and the controversy surrounding it, but it’s still a solid game. You’re tasked with creating a plague to wipe out all of humanity. There’s several different plague types to choose from, and some expansion plagues (as IAPs) like zombies and vampires to expand the game. It’s free with ads, or you can make a one time purchase to remove ads. It has a few other IAPs, but nothing worth paying for other than opening up custom scenario slots if you like playing them (which I recommend, they’re a lot of fun), as everything else can be unlocked by just playing the game. Full Play Games services for achievements and leaderboards, and cloud save.
Bio Inc. - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=air.com.dryginstudios.bioinc
There’s a lot of Plague Inc. imitators, itself technically being one of them, but this one is really good. It’s essentially the same concept, but instead of infecting humanity with a plague, you’re focused on ending the life of one unfortunate individual. You can use an array of different diseases, force nurses to go on strike, and spin the wheel of STD’s. It’s all very fun. This one like Plague Inc., has multiple IAPs available, but there’s only one you really need to purchase. The unlimited coins purchase will remove all ads and remove any sort of time constraints. Everything else can be unlocked just by playing the game. It also has Play Games services for achievements and leaderboards, and cloud save.
Poly Bridge - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.drycactus.polybridge
Bridge building games on android are a dime a dozen, but this one in particular is pretty nice. The graphics are beautiful, there’s 105 levels that are pretty tough, and a very in-depth sandbox mode, all for a one time fee of $0.99. It also has Play Games services for achievements and leaderboards, as well as cloud save. It’s a total bargain and a must have if you like bridge building games.
Game Dev Tycoon - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.greenheartgames.gdt
This is another PC port that feels right at home on a touch screen. This sim basically has you creating games through the history of video games. Investing and developing games for new consoles, constantly trying to create that 10/10 game everybody will love. It’s surprisingly in-depth, and a lot of fun. It’ll take you a few tries to get all the way through the campaign, and you could essentially keep playing the same save indefinitely, or until you went bankrupt. It takes a while to unlock everything, so you’ll be playing for a while. If you’ve played it on PC and want a mobile version, or if you’ve never played it, it’s definitely a solid purchase. It’s a little pricey on the “mobile games should be free” scale with a one time price of $4.99, but I think it’s worth it. Play Games services for achievements, leaderboards, and cloud save.
Puzzle:
The Room (The Room, The Room Two, The Room 3, Old Sins) - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.FireproofStudios.TheRoom
I’m sure everyone has heard of this series of games by now, but if you haven't, get out from under that digital rock and give them a whirl. Even people who aren't really into puzzle games have fun with them, and with The Room only being $0.99, it’s worth trying out. It’s essentially a series of escape rooms, with clever puzzles or hidden keys you have to find or decipher in order to move onto the next, with a creepy atmosphere. There’s an interesting mystery unfolding across the series, each one leading into the next. The graphics in these games are beautiful. Plug in your headphones and play in a dark room and it can be a little bit eerie. One of the best examples there is of perfect touch controls. Each one has a one time purchase between $0.99 and $4.99, although they go on sale A LOT. I got all four of them for $0.99 each, which is well worth it if you’re willing to wait for a sale. Still well worth the regular price though, in my opinion. All of them have Play Games support for achievements and leaderboards, as well as cloud save (except for The Room, no cloud save on that particular one).
Monument Valley - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.ustwo.monumentvalley
This is one of those stand out android games that everybody knows about and everybody has on their best-of lists. It’s basically here because everyone will beat me up if it isn't, also it’s a damn fine game. It’s not the hardest puzzle game out there, but there are parts that make you think. The story is pretty good, and the graphics are beautiful. It’s definitely worth your time and money, and everyone should give it a play. I really enjoyed it, and my 5 year old daughter really, really liked this one, and was able to progress all the way through the main story with a little help here and there. It’s that kind of “for everybody” type of game. At $3.99 I feel it’s a little steep for as much as you get from it, but it does go on sale pretty frequently. I was able to pick it up for $0.99 during a sale, which is a good deal. It has Play Games support for achievements and cloud save. There’s also a sequel, Monument Valley 2, which is available for $4.99. I’ve purchased that one too, but havent had a chance to play it yet.
Slayaway Camp - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.bluewizard.slayawaycamp
I really like this game. A port of the PC version, and absolutely perfect for touch controls. An ode to all the great slasher films of the 80’s, it’s a puzzle game with all the cutesy gore you can handle. Take control of Skullface and take down all those pesky campers, but don’t harm the cats. With a ton of levels all themed to different slasher VHS tapes, a ton of unlockable killers, a fast paced kill frenzy mini-game, and tons of menu sliders, this is an awesome addition to your collection for only $2.99. Has Play Games services for achievements. Unfortunately there’s no cloud save, but that’s the only flaw I can think of for this game.
Agent A: A Puzzle Game in Disguise - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=co.yakand.agentaapuzzleindisguise&hl=en_US
Here’s another puzzle game, this time you take on the role of Agent A, a master spy, trying to track down and capture Ruby La Rouge. It’s a point and click style adventure, with lots of puzzles and hidden objects. The graphics are awesome, and the style and atmosphere of a 60’s era James Bond film really put this one over the top. There’s five chapters to complete, with the fifth chapter being released soon. Awesome touch controls and an intriguing story, this one is a damn good deal for $1.29. Play Games support for achievements and leaderboards. No cloud save that I’m aware of, but you can start at any chapter you’d like from the beginning, so not really necessary, still a missed feature though.
Platformer:
Super Mario Run - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nintendo.zara
This one is polarizing from what I’ve seen on Reddit. You either love it or hate it. I love it. I think Mario’s first outing on android is pretty awesome. With 33+ levels, with different color coins to collect in each, a kingdom building mode that lets you design your own mushroom kingdom, multiple playable characters, a race mode to challenge your friends, and a pretty cool quick play mode called Remix 10, it’s a pretty solid Mario game. There’s still a surprising amount of depth, even with you only controlling Mario’s jumping. The biggest downside to this game is needing a constant online connection to play, which is pretty bogus, but if you can get over that I say it’s worth it. The first four levels are free, with one IAP of (admittedly kind of steep) $9.99. I think $5.99 would have been a much fairer price, but it’s Mario we’re talking about, and that name comes with a premium, so it is what it is.
Leo’s Fortune - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.leosfortune
In my opinion, this is the very first game to do platforming controls on a touch screen correctly. It’s based on touch and swipe as opposed to on screen buttons, which to me are annoying. You play as a cute green mustachioed fuzz ball named Leo, trying to get back your lost fortune. Graphics in this game are stunningly beautiful, with more than 20 levels and a handful of bonus levels and time challenges, it’ll take a while to complete. This one is right in the middle at $4.99, and is well worth it if you’re into platformers. I highly recommend it.
Oddmar - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.mobge.Oddmar
This one is brand new to android (it’s been on IOS for a while, I guess). From the same team that made Leo’s Fortune comes Oddmar. You play as a mushroom hopping, axe wielding viking looking for your lost people. The cutscene artwork reminds me of Ren & Stimpy in a weird way, and the games levels are smart and beautiful. Like Leo’s Fortune, the touch controls are superb, better than any platformer has business being on a touch screen. You can play the first five levels for free, then there’s a one time IAP for $5.49 to unlock the rest of the game. This is my favorite platformer for android. Play Games support for achievements, leaderboards, and cloud saving.
Sports:
OK Golf - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.okidokico.okgolf
There’s only one sports game on the list, and it’s OK, OK Golf. Beautiful graphics, easy controls, and cleverly hidden holes make this a lot of fun. I’ve been playing this game for a year or more now, and the developer is actively updating it with new courses regularly. Earn stars for finishing on par or below to unlock more courses. It’s pretty straight forward and a lot of fun. Easy to pick up and play anywhere, and can be played both horizontally and vertically. Not bad for the one time price of $2.99. Play Games support for achievements and leaderboards, and cloud save.
Multiplayer:
SpaceTeam - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sleepingbeastgames.spaceteam
I’m positive everyone has been suggested this game either here or elsewhere before, but that’s because it’s that good. One of, if not the best local multiplayer game for android. The task at hand is to prolong your inevitable death and keep your ship from exploding. You have a bunch of switches and buttons in front of you, along with instructions on what to do, but not all the instructions correspond with the switches and buttons on your screen. This leads to a lot of yelling at your teammates, which escalates the stress and the fun. For 2-4 players, you can connect your phones over bluetooth or wifi, and you can even play with IOS users. A single IAP of $4.99 will unlock Play Games achievements, more ships, outfits, a companion kitty, challenges, and a few other things. Totally optional, not needed at all to enjoy the game. This game really is a ton of fun to play with your friends. Highly recommended.
Death Squared - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.smgstudio.deathsquared
This game is absolutely hilarious. I put it under multiplayer because it can played by you and a friend at the same time using the same phone, my wife and I had a good time playing quite a few stages on my phone together, but is also a puzzle game that can be played completely solo. That’s mainly how I’ve been playing it, and it’s a lot of fun. You control two robots (acting as the AI being tested) trying to work together to accomplish the simple task of standing on your corresponding spaces, but getting there is no easy task. If you’re anything like me, you’ll fail a lot. And everytime you do, the guy overseeing the tests and his AI companion have a hilarious comment about your failings, and is less than impressed with your accomplishments. It’s a game I’ve come across fairly recently and have been having a lot of fun with it. With 80ish story mode levels, and a ton of pretty tough bonus levels, you’ll be playing this one for a while. The touch controls work flawlessly, and the graphics are as cute as the little robot’s hats. You’ll have a good time with this one. There’s a one time purchase of $2.99 to unlock the entire game, no further IAP or ads. Play Games support for achievements and leaderboards. No cloud support that I’m aware of.
There you have it! My collection of (full) games that feel right at home on your android phone. I think it’s a pretty good collection, let me know what you guys think.
submitted by thelivingdead188 to AndroidGaming [link] [comments]

My idea for starting a golf charity

So I have a "beer shed" in my back yard. It has a flat screen tv and a fridge and is located next to my grills. I like it a lot.
The other night I was having a few beers, hanging out with my chocolate lab, Ophelia, and watching golf videos on YouTube when an idea kind of hit me. I've been brainstorming it like a maniac for a couple of days and think it might be a worthwhile pursuit.
My background: I've been a pediatric nurse for the last 20 years. I've primarily worked in pediatric intensive care and pediatric cardiac intensive care. Right now I take care of babies and kids before and after open heart surgery. I spent about 10 years doing pediatric and neonatal transport in airplanes, helicopters, and ambulances. I've worked with charity groups that provide heart surgeries to children in countries like the Dominican Republic, Peru, and El Salvador. I was in Haiti after the earthquake. Taking care of sick kids is a huge part of who I am.
When my wife and I started a family of our own I cut out the international travel for charity work. My wife is a nurse as well and its pretty hard to get away for two weeks at a time with babies at home. Due to hectic work schedules and changing priorities, I gave up my country club membership and cut back on golf. Pretty soon a second baby comes, grad school happens, and things get away from you. I was away from the game for quite some time. Now my little boys are showing interest and I'll have the flexibility in the fall to play a lot more. I already have the bug again and since the spring I'm rediscovering my swing. While I still can't get away with my charity team and do two weeks of cardiac cases anymore, I can make it out to the golf course. I was thinking of a way that I can make some of that time worthwhile as well. I'm trying to find a way to join my love of golf with a love of children's charities.
The Charity Idea: So what if we could make every round or hole we played in a season matter? What if every time you played a round you were doing something small to help out a charity that helps sick kids and their families? Would it be worth a few more bucks a round to your group?
So i was thinking I'd pick a buddy for the season and we'd each play for a specific children's charity. One guy plays for the Ronald McDonald House and the other plays for Make a Wish. All season long at the end of the round we compare score cards. We take a nominal amount of money like 25 cents and do 18 skins and a 25 cent Nassau. Between the two of us that ends up being $5.25 for the round. At the end, you donate whatever parts you "won" to your specific charity. (If you lose all 18 skins and three Nassau bets, face it, you owe a sick kid 5 bucks.) It isn't a huge amount of money but over the course of a season it adds up.
I know for myself I hit at least two balls worth four bucks in the drink pretty much every round.
Do you guys think something like this could catch on around your group or local club?
Other Napkin Thoughts
At any rate, if you made it this far thanks for reading. I'm still in the imagination phase and have no idea how to implement this even on a small scale. I guess getting it going at one club would be a decent proof of concept. Even if this is something we could just figure out how to do within our little golf community here I think it would be pretty cool.
Thoughts?
submitted by johnnycourage to golf [link] [comments]

To help you increase the fun (and pressure), I wanted to create a list of golf betting games to find the right one for your group. 1. The Nassau Origins of the Nassau. The $2 or $5 Nassau is probably one of the most fun and easiest way to golf when betting with friends. But the original Nassau had nothing to do with gambling. 2020 Workday Charity Open Betting Picks, Sleepers and Fades: Buy Low on Scottie Scheffler at Muirfield Village Read now That’s not the end of the story, sure. Ownership is very important because having overlapping lineups really kills your expected value. US Open Betting Odds. View all available outright and match odds, plus get news, tips, free bets and money-back offers. All you need to bet. Betting on golf is pretty straightforward but it does have a few quirks compared to team games like football, baseball and ice hockey. Once you get the hang of it, however, golf betting is one of the most fun ways to gamble on pro sports. Official website of the 2020 U.S. Open Championship at Winged Foot Golf Club, in Mamaroneck, N.Y. Buy tickets and follow the action with scoring, live streaming and full coverage.

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